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  • Western Art Collector magazine preview of Quest for the West®

    by | | Aug 29, 2018

    Hallmark_La_Parroquia


    Western Art Collector
     magazine published a spread about the 13th annual Quest for the West® Art Show and Sale at the Eiteljorg Museum. The sale is Sept. 7-8 and the Quest exhibit is open to the general public Sept. 9-Oct. 7.  Read the article at this link:
    Western.Art.Collector_August 2018_Quest Preview






    Image caption:

    George Hallmark
    La Parroquia, 2018
    Oil on linen
    36 x 36 inches





  • Native Arts magazine trains museum spotlight on the Eiteljorg

    by | | Aug 22, 2018

    Native Arts Magazine, a publication of Santa Fean Magazine, included the Eiteljorg in its August “museum spotlight” issue. To read it, click on the link:
    Native Arts Magazine -- Santa Fean





  • The country’s top Western artists return for another Quest for the West®

    by Bert Beiswanger, director of marketing and communications | Jun 28, 2018

    Jerry Jordan_Traditions_Remembered
    Jerry Jordan
    Traditions Remembered, 2018
    Oil
    40 x 40 inches

    The Western art world once again will converge on Indianapolis on Sept. 7-8, when one of the top Western art sales in the nation, the annual Quest for the West® Art Show and Sale, returns to the Eiteljorg. 

    Quest’s opening weekend festivities draw Western art enthusiasts from all over the country. Many of the artists and collectors consider Quest to be one of their favorite shows due to its unique format and intimate, engaging setting. And what Quest has meant to the Eiteljorg cannot be overstated, as it has generated more than $12 million in art sales since its inaugural year, 2006. 

    In addition to its prominence nationally, Quest for the West® is simply one of the finest, if not largest, art sales in Indianapolis and the Midwest. Whether you’re an avid Western art collector or just beginning your art-collecting journey, Quest is one of the most intriguing shows you can attend. It all takes place within the beautifully artistic confines of the Eiteljorg Museum in the heart of downtown Indianapolis.

    Buxton, Before There Were None
    John Buxton
    Passenger Pigeons, Before There Were None, 2018
    Oil
    25 x 21 inches

    Opening weekend attendees will be the first to see and bid on paintings and sculpture by the country’s most prominent Western artists in a “luck-of-the-draw” sale. What makes the Quest show special is that potential buyers have the chance not only to be among the first to see the art in person, but to meet the artists who created it.

    The entire sale is a thrill, start to finish, from the sound of the bugle that opens the sale to the excited looks on the faces of successful buyers at the end of the evening.

    All artwork remains on exhibit at the Eiteljorg until Oct. 7, giving museum visitors the opportunity to see this world-class art. Pieces not sold during opening weekend remain available for purchase until the exhibit closes.

    2017Quest_232
    Sculptor Curt Mattson at the 2017 Quest for the West® Art Show and Sale

    Opening weekend registrants this year will enjoy a Friday lunch and tour at the Benjamin Harrison Presidential Site, a Friday evening reception, and the opening of a special exhibition featuring 2017 Quest Artist of Distinction Howard Post, as well as the return of a Miniature Art Sale. On Saturday evening during the banquet and awards ceremony, many lucky attendees will win a limited edition 2018 Eiteljorg Keepsake.

    To register for opening weekend, contact: Kay Hinds at 317.275.1341 or khinds@eiteljorg.com. You also may register as an absentee buyer.

    Preview art and find complete information on Quest at www.quest.eiteljorg.org.


    2017Quest_Pat Anker views miniatures at sale
    The Miniature Art Sale was a big hit at the 2017 Quest celebration. Eiteljorg board member Pat Anker, center, considered some miniature paintings.

    Miniature Art Sale Returns
    We heard the pleas of many Quest attendees over the years. Some beginning collectors fell in love with the art they saw but couldn’t afford it, while others with the financial means had no room to add large works to their home. Thus, the Eiteljorg last year instituted a Quest Miniature Art Sale. Back by popular demand, the miniature sale is Friday night, Sept. 7, where you can purchase smaller pieces of art and take them with you that evening.


    2017Quest_Howard Post Artist of Distinction
    Artist Howard Post, right, and his wife Marilyn Post attended the 2017 Quest for the West® Art Show and Sale at the Eiteljorg, where Howard Post received the 2017 Artist of Distinction award.

    Howard Post, 2017 Quest for the West® Artist of Distinction
    The Eiteljorg Museum will open a special exhibit featuring the art of Howard Post in conjunction with the 2018 Quest for the West®. Post won the Artist of Distinction Award at the 2017 Quest, and the exhibit celebrates that honor. For more than 30 years, he has captured his distinctive vision of the West in paint, creating what he refers to as “ranchscapes.” The exhibit will feature approximately 20 of these works from the past decade of Post’s career. From rugged mountains to dusty cowboys to resting horses to complex corrals, his paintings highlight the interconnectedness of land, animals and people in the American West. They also explore and delight in more abstract concepts such as light, line and color. The exhibit runs Sept. 8–Nov. 25 in the Gerald and Dorit Paul Gallery.



    McGurl_Girl_of_the_Golden_West_the_Sailing_Canoe
    Joseph McGurl
    Girl of the Golden West: The Sailing Canoe, 2018
    Oil on panel
    20 x 30 inches

    QUEST FOR THE WEST® 2018 list of artists

    Gerald Balciar*
    John Buxton
    G. Russell Case
    Bruce Cheever
    Tim Cherry*
    Rox Corbett
    Brent Cotton
    Glenn Dean
    Steve Devenyns
    Mikel Donahue
    Michael Dudash
    Barry Eisenach*
    Josh Elliott
    Tony Eubanks
    John Fawcett
    Robert Griffing
    David Grossmann
    Logan Maxwell Hagege
    George Hallmark
    Karin Hollebeke
    Donna Howell-Sickles
    Doug Hyde*
    Terry Isaac
    Jerry Jordan
    Greg Kelsey*
    Mark Kelso
    Mark Maggiori
    Curt Mattson*
    Joseph McGurl
    Krystii Melaine
    Denis Milhomme
    Jay Moore
    John Moyers
    Terri Kelly Moyers
    Brenda Murphy
    Rock Newcomb
    P.A. Nisbet
    Robert Peters
    Howard Post
    Heide Presse
    Scott Rogers*
    Gladys Roldan-de-Moras
    Roseta Santiago
    Sandy Scott*
    Adam Smith
    Daniel Smith
    Nathan Solano
    Tim Solliday
    Andy Thomas
    David Wright

    Bold names are artists new to Quest
    *sculptors


    13TH ANNUAL
    QUEST FOR THE WEST® ART SHOW AND SALE
    OPENING WEEKEND:  SEPT 7–8
    EXHIBIT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC:  SEPT 9–OCT 7

    Presented by:
    Cardinal Contracting
    The Western Art Society

    Sponsored by:
    Ice Miller LLP

     

    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 

     





  • Announcing an exciting new acquisition: "The Golden Mountain, Arriving San Francisco, 1865"

    by James H. Nottage, vice president and chief curatorial officer and Gund curator of Western art, history and culture | Jun 20, 2018

    The Golden Mountain Arriving in San Francisco 1865
    The Golden Mountain, Arriving San Francisco, 1865, by Mian Situ, oil on canvas, 2003
    Museum Purchase with funds provided by the Eiteljorg Museum’s Western Art Society

    Covered wagons pulled by oxen and moving the essential belongings of hopeful travelers headed toward the setting sun is the common narrative of the 19th century westward movement. This storyline excludes the immigrant experience of many others who traveled eastward by ship to become undeniable contributors to the building of rail lines, gold mines and elements of commerce from San Francisco to the Black Hills.

    Artist Mian Situ (born in Canton, China, 1953) gained his formal art training in China and immigrated to the United States in 1987. Since then, he has become a highly regarded artist, devoting his work to portrayals of his rural native land and to expressing much of the Chinese experience in the American West. The Eiteljorg Museum is proud to announce it has acquired one of Situ’s best-known works and will feature it in the newly redesigned Western galleries that will reopen in November 2018. The Golden Mountain, Arriving San Francisco, 1865, is six feet high and 60 inches wide. In this 2003 painting, Situ has created a composition embracing a family in the center sunlight, the deck of the ship crowded with tired but hopeful individuals seeking opportunities in a land new to them.

    Artist Mian Situ working at his easel
    Artist Mian Situ, working at his easel

    When first exhibited at the Autry Museum at its annual Masters of the American West show in 2003, the painting received the Thomas Moran Memorial Award for best painting and both the Artists’ Choice and Patrons’ Choice awards recognizing its qualities as a significant accomplishment in the field. Now the eastward-moving work will find its permanent home in Indianapolis. The painting significantly adds to our growing holdings that help visitors understand the diverse nature of the art, history and cultures of the West.



    This article previously appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • James Nottage retires after 50 years in Western museums

    by Bryan Corbin, Storyteller magazine editor | Jun 14, 2018

    James Nottage, Chief Curator
    James Nottage

    The curator who led the Eiteljorg Museum’s curatorial and collections efforts for the past 17 years is an authentic son of the West. James Nottage grew up in Laramie, Wyoming, and remembers as a small child meeting a turn-of-the-last-century Old West train robber, long since paroled and a larger than life character. “He had these extraordinary stories about robbing trains and going to prison; and that motivated my young imagination,” James said.

    That spark lit the fire of James’ love of the history and heritage of the West, which led ultimately to his 50-year career in museums. Since 2001, James has served as the Eiteljorg’s vice president and chief curatorial officer and as the Gund curator of Western art, history and culture. His management and creative vision led to important acquisitions such as the Helen Cox Kersting and Kenneth “Bud” Adams collections, and to exhibitions such as Guitars and Red/Black. He has authored and edited many Eiteljorg art publications and closely worked with artists, collectors, donors and scholars.

    As he retires from the Eiteljorg in June, James said what has been most motivating throughout his career was the opportunity to work on major projects involving the expansion or creation of museums: at the Kansas Museum of History early on, at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles at its founding, and then at the Eiteljorg during its 2005 expansion that doubled the size of the museum.

    “Being a curator is an opportunity to have some really important privileges,” James said, such as the responsibility to work with important objects and artworks and help people understand them. “It’s the kind of job where you have the opportunity to work with a range of people who can share your passions,” including artists, colleagues and also patrons who support the museum financially or with donations of art. “Of all the places that I’ve worked, the Eiteljorg is rather profoundly successful in relating to all sorts of people,” he said.

    Early museum years
    Knowing from a young age in Laramie that he would be a museum curator, James discovered the untapped scholarly potential of studying the West professionally. “As I went through early jobs, early college, it was clear that an emphasis on the study of America was always heavily weighted on the East Coast, and there is plenty of room to do things besides Pilgrims,” he said.

    He served in state historical institutions in Wyoming and Kansas, earning two master’s degrees along the way. In 1985, James and his wife Mary Ellen were the first employees hired by the new Autry Museum — where he was vice president and founding chief curator, she the vice president of collections. The museum was founded by Gene Autry, the singing cowboy, movie and TV star and baseball team owner.

    “He loved a good joke and a good meal and was very personable,” James said of Gene Autry in his later years. “The challenge anything, it was difficult for some people -- including myself -- to separate this well-known and regarded personality from just being an everyday person.  It was hard to have a restaurant meal (with him) and him not be interrupted all the time” by Autry’s fans.

    Eiteljorg.Museum.The Reel West.Exhibit
    Eiteljorg Museum exhibit The Reel West, with "Lone Ranger" costume items of Clayton Moore.

    Through the Autry Museum, James got to know many well-known entertainers — not only Gene Autry, but Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, and Clayton Moore, TV’s Lone Ranger. “He was hugely personable and very kind. (Moore) always astounded me: I met him the first time and it would have been maybe a year later when I saw him again, and he greeted me by name and asked about my wife by name. He was an extraordinary individual in a lot of ways, so he kind of justified my childhood perceptions of the heroic Lone Ranger,” James recalled.

    West in the Midwest
    The opportunity for James to work on the Eiteljorg’s expansion drew the Nottages from L.A. to Indianapolis in 2001. Among the many exhibitions whose curation he led and managed, James cited Red/Black in 2011 that explored shared histories of Native Americans and African-Americans, focusing on their touching connections. “I think that’s the value of any museum. It’s not just that you might say, ‘We have a great painting or an object,’ but you can see for yourself and tell the public about how something connects with people’s real lives, whether it’s part of someone’s creativity, or an object that’s very telling about events in people’s lives.”

    Retiring as chief curator, James will continue to consult on the Eiteljorg’s Western gallery reinstallation and on a future exhibit. His wife Mary Ellen is retired executive director of the Indiana Medical History Museum. A music buff and collector, James is learning to play steel guitar, and retirement might afford more time for music and to finish personal book projects. The Nottages plan to remain in the area and attend Eiteljorg events.

    James said it’s been rewarding to see the Eiteljorg Museum mature and grow in terms of major acquisitions, educational programming, collections, publications and recognition among scholars and the general public. “There’s plenty of room for future growth. It’s a young institution with a good soul; it’s great to be a part of that.”



    Top Image Caption:

    James Nottage, vice president and chief curatorial officer and Gund curator of Western art, history and culture, is retiring after 17 years at the Eiteljorg, where he managed the museum’s curatorial and collections departments. He is seen here in the museum’s work area with the E.I. Couse painting, The Wedding. The 1924 oil painting was a gift to the museum courtesy of Harrison Eiteljorg.

    The James Nottage File:

    • Eiteljorg Museum: Vice president and chief curatorial officer, Gund curator of Western art history and culture, 2001-2018
    • Autry Museum of Western Heritage, vice president and founding chief curator, 1985-2001
    • Kansas Museum of History, supervisory historian, assistant museum director, curator of exhibits, 1977-1985
    • University of Wyoming Archives, archivist, 1976-1977
    • Wyoming State Museum, assistant curator, 1969-1975
    • Laramie Centennial Committee Museum, curator, 1968
    • BA and MA in American history and American studies, University of Wyoming, 1972, 1976
    • MA in history museum studies, Cooperstown Graduate Program, State University College at Oneonta, NY, 1975
    • Author, editor, lecturer, consultant with a focus on art, history and cultures of the American West


    Upcoming Events at the Eiteljorg Museum:

    Thursday, November 8

    5:30 p.m.
    Special celebration in honor of James H. Nottage’s retirement.*

    Friday, November 9

    6:00 p.m.
    Preview of reopened Western galleries, for members.*

    *For reservations to the above two events, please contact mwhistler@eiteljorg.org or call 317.275.1316.

    Saturday, November 10
    1 p.m. 
    James H. Nottage delivers the annual Gund Lecture about the new exhibition, Attitudes: The West in American Art.  The lecture is included with regular museum admission, and members are free.


    On Eiteljorg.org
    For behind-the-scenes updates on the work of museum employees, read the Eiteljorg blog:
    http://www.eiteljorg.org/interact/blog/eitelblog/2018/05/29/hello-goodbye-longtime-employees-will-be-missed-new-employees-welcomed

     

    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 

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