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  • Eiteljorg Museum awards more than $23,000 to Native American artists

    by DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg public relations manager | Jun 26, 2014

    Judges evaluated more than 200 entries featuring the best work
    of Native artists from across North America.

    INDIANAPOLIS— Upstate New York natives, Ronnie Leigh (Onondaga) and Stonehorse Goeman (Seneca), who specialize in combining traditional Iroquois methods of basket making with sculpture, took the coveted Best of Show honor at the 22nd annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival where more than 130 Native American artists, from across the country, were honored for their artwork. Some of the highest honors went to artists from Arizona, Kansas, Oklahoma, New York, Wisconsin and Vancouver, BC.

    Nationally-known judges, Anita Fields (Osage), Yatika Fields (Cherokee/Creek/Osage), Jamie Okuma (Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock), Linley B. Logan (Seneca, Deer Clan) and Duane Maktima (Laguna Pueblo/Hopi) awarded more than $23,000  in cash and ribbons within 10 divisions, including Best of Show, Best of Division and special awards: the Helen Kersting Award, which is given to an artist whose work exemplifies the highest quality of execution and innovation within a traditional medium, and the Harrison Eiteljorg Purchase Award (awarded to two artists this year), which acquires work for the museum’s permanent collection.


    Best of Show
    He Takes His Place by Ronnie Leigh Goeman (Onondaga) and Stonehorse Goeman (Seneca)
    Nedrow, NY
    Click here to listen to Ronnie Leigh’s reaction shortly after learning she’d won.
     
    Helen Kersting Award
    Circular Feather Set by Brian Szabo (Sicangu Lakota-Rosebud Sioux Tribe)
    Fort Atkinson, WI

    Harrison Eiteljorg Purchase Award
    Doyunis (The Water Spider) wampum necklace by Antonio Grant (Eastern Band Cherokee)
    Tahelquah, OK

    Harrison Eiteljorg Purchase Award
    Blue Herons Basket by Ronnie Leigh Goeman (Onondaga) and Stonehorse Goeman (Seneca)
    Nedrow, NY

    The 2014 Eiteljorg Museum Indian Market and Festival Best of Division winners:

    Painting, drawings, photography and prints
    On to Market by Jodi M. Webster (Ho-Chunk Nation/Prairie Band Potawatomi)
    Lawrence, KS

    Sculpture
    Rainbow Maidens by Ryan Gashweseoma (Hopi)
    Kingman, AZ

    Carvings and dolls
    Sunface Katsina by Gerry Quotskuyva (Hopi)
    Rimrock, AZ

    Jewelry
    Circular Feather Set by Brian Szabo (Sicangu Lakota-Rosebud Sioux Tribe))
    Fort Atkinson, WI

    Pottery
    Nature by Delmar Polacca (Hopi/Tewa)
    Tuba City, AZ

    Basketry
    He Takes His Place by Ronnie Leigh Goeman (Onondaga) and Stonehorse Goeman (Seneca )
    Nedrow, NY

    Weavings and textiles
    Blue Canyon by Florence Manygoats (Navajo (Dine))

    Tonahea, AZ

    Cultural items
    Warrior’s Ceremonial Cup by Antonio Grant (Eastern Band Cherokee)
    Tahelquah, OK

    Beadwork
    Calm Waters Run Deep by Sho Sho Esquiro (KaskaKene)
    Ross River, Yukon Territory, Vancouver, British Columbia

    Collaborative
    Did You Just Say Ribbit? By Ronnie Leigh Goeman (Onondaga) and Stonehorse Goeman (Seneca)
    Nedrow, NY

    This year, more than 6,100 people enjoyed  the two-day festival, which is the largest juried sale and show of Native American art in the Midwest. Entertainment for the market included Grammy award winning singer Joanne Shenandoah (Iroquois), world champion hoop dancer Tony Duncan with Estun-bah (Apache/Hidatsa/Arikara/Mandan) and Native rock duo Scatter Their Own (Oglala Lakota), who had just performed a gig during South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas. Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival has become a mainstay in the Indianapolis arts community, allowing the public to enjoy not only celebrated artwork, but a full cultural experience of authentic Native American foods, performances, art demonstrations and family activities.

    To be eligible to participate in the Indian Market and Festival, all entries must be handmade within the last two years by the artist entering the piece. They must also be available for purchase during the Eiteljorg Museum Indian Market and Festival, and must not include any part of a species of protected animal. To ensure the authenticity of the artwork and to protect the artists, all artists must provide documentation confirming that they are members of a state- or federally-recognized tribe.

    Go comment!




  • Adding Flavor to our Festival | What to Eat at next weekend's Indian Market

    by Kat Chappell, Eiteljorg festivals and markets intern | Jun 12, 2014

    As the 22nd annual Indian Market and Festival approaches, everyone here at the Eiteljorg is excited—not only about the artists and the entertainment, but also about the food!
     

    This year, in addition to the wonderful Indian tacos and Buffalo Burgers from Old West Foods, Baskin Robbins ice creams, kettle corn, and Hubbard and Cravens coffee drinks, we’ve invited some of Indy’s most-loved food trucks to flavor our festival. We want to welcome Scratch Truck, Johnson’s BBQ Shack, Der Pretzel Wagen, and Scout’s Treat Truck! Additionally, we’ve done away with the food tickets; you pay, you eat. No more fiddling!

    Scratch BurgerScratch Truck offers up gourmet burgers and fries that some customers have called “life changing.” Try their Scratch Burger, complete with bacon marmalade, or refresh yourself with a cool Blueberry Thyme Lemonade—a fantastic summer treat.

    Using shagbark hickory and apple wood purchased from Apple Works in Trafalgar, Indiana, Johnson’s BBQ Shack puts nearly a decade and a half of experience into their smoked meat sandwiches. They offer simple but delicious meals—their Pulled Pork is especially famous—coupled with three types of homemade sauces ranging from mild to hot hot hot!

    Want whimsy with your food? Der Pretzel Wagen is right up your alley! Who wouldn’t Der Pretzelwant to try their Ham Solo or Chuebakka? Even if you’re not a Star Wars fan, there’s something for everyone on a pretzel bun, from black bean burgers to pastrami. Quench your thirst with Goose Island Root Beer in a glass bottle, or satisfy your sweet tooth with a Bavarian style rolled cinnamon sugar pretzel.

    Speaking of sweet teeth, Scout’s Treat Truck is serving up all kinds of delights. If you want something cool and a little tart, check out their lovely Lemon Shakeup. If you want to go all in and pamper yourself, their Mr. Donut Cupcake is receiving rave reviews. Finally, if you want a little salt with your sweet, try a sea salt brownie—the best of both worlds.

    There will be something for everyone at the Indian Market and Festival—we can’t wait to see you there!



    ABOUT INDIAN MARKET & FESTIVAL
    Join us for a weekend celebration of Native American cultures through art, music, dance, demonstrations, food and more. Featuring Native performers and more than 150 artists from more than 60 tribes, Indian Market and Festival is a one-of-a kind cultural experience right here in the Midwest. Click this link to purchase tickets. Advance tickets are $10 and include admission for one adult (children 17 and under are free) to the Indian Market and Festival and the museum. All proceeds benefit the Eiteljorg Museum. The Market will be held rain or shine and the tickets are not refundable. Tickets are valid for one day only and should be picked up at the Will-Call stand (Main Gate) by presenting your e-mail receipt. No pets or coolers allowed.
     
    - Kat Chappell, Eiteljorg festivals and markets intern

    Go comment!




  • Eiteljorg Insider| 5 Questions with Summer Peters

    by Jaq Nigg, Eiteljorg festivals and markets manager | Jul 11, 2013

    We caught up with bead worker Summer Peters who won Best of Show at the Eiteljorg Indian Market with her beadwork portrait Gentleman Jim. A single mom and full time artist, she is a tribal member of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe in Michigan, but lives in Phoenix, AZ. It was her first time coming to the Eiteljorg market and she blew everyone away with her creativity and talent.


    Summer Peters (Saginaw Chippewa), Gentleman Jim, Best of Show Winner at the 2013 Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival

     
    1. What inspires you?
    What inspires me is fashion, places I've been to, experiences I've had, nature, people watching, and a desire to learn more. It doesn't take much. I see beauty in almost everything. I love talking about art with other artists. I like watching things being built.

     2. If you could steal any piece of art in the world to have in your home, what would it be?
    I'd have to bypass the obvious choices of the Mona Lisa or some Picasso painting, it would definitely be, Spirit of the Forest by Odilon Redon. I learned about him in one of my art history courses.

     3. If you weren’t an artist, what would you be?
    I would most definitely be an ironworker in the NYC skyline or some sort of home builder/architect/interior designer. I have a strong academic background in the technical side of building things.

     4. What is your favorite tool? 
    My favorite tool is my needle nose plier. It makes everything perfect! I'm very very very much a perfectionist about my work, even though they say nothing in the world is perfect. If there's an extra bead on my string and I've already attached it to the canvas, I snap it off.

     5. What do you listen to while you work?
    I usually turn on the TV and find a show that I can listen to. I don't really listen to music while I work. Music has a strong attachment to memories in my life, good and bad, so I don't listen to it. I don't like sad feelings seeping into my work.  One time, though, I turned on classical music and I was beading like a mad woman! I need to do that again. 

     About Gentleman Jim:
    Gentleman Jim
    is beadwork portrait of Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox). The piece was created to bring attention to Native American people who have made great accomplishments in mainstream society.

    Go comment!




  • Recapping the 2013 Eiteljorg Indian Market & Festival

    by By Jaq Nigg, festivals and markets manager | Jun 28, 2013

    Every June, the Eiteljorg brings gifted Native American artists and performers together with visitors for a celebration of Native American cultures. It’s a culmination of yearlong efforts as well as a “family reunion” for artists, museum staff and visitors. There’s always so much to see and do. Here are a few of the things I saw and did.

    Indian Market and Festival weekend started early Friday morning with artists arriving for judging and setting up in Military Park.




    Friday evening’s Preview Party is the official kick off of the weekend. Many of the artists were there and it was a wonderful and relaxed opportunity to spend time with them before the business of the weekend took over. The Best of Show Exhibit gave a chance to see all the prize winning artwork in one place, including Best of Show, Harrison Eiteljorg Purchase Award and the Helen Cox Kersting Award. Complete list of prize winners.
     

    Beadwork portrait, Gentleman Jim by Summer Peters (Saginaw Ojibwe Tribe of Michigan) won Best of Show. It was Summer’s first time at the Eiteljorg Indian Market!



    Potters, Pahponee (Kickapoo/Potawatomi) and Dominique Toya (Jemez Pueblo), admire the Harrison Eiteljorg Purchase Award winner, Love Gun, by Susan Folwell (Santa Clara Pueblo)

    Early Saturday morning, collectors and visitors lined up along the lovely canal path and West Street. Artists hurried to get to their booths and the sun warmed the day – but not too warm! A pleasant breeze and the shade trees kept things comfortable. As artists opened their booths and greeted each other, museum staff whizzed around on golf carts doing final tasks. Volunteers provided coffee, fruit, bagels and ice to the artists. The performers finished their sound checks. The food vendors started cooking and the media came for interviews. We were ready to open!

     


    Main admissions at 10am.


    I talked on camera to WTHR (NBC-Indianapolis) before Shelley Morningsong played her flute.

    The first stop for many visitors was the artist tents. Some artists sell out so it’s important to visit favorites early. Other popular destinations included the Dogbane Family Activity Area where kids of all ages created their own artwork to take home; the Delaware encampment and, of course, the performance tent.


    Rumors spread that artists seemed to be selling well: potter Jody Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo) only had two small pots left by Noon; Peter Boome (Upper Skagit) sold a bentwood box; sculptor Mark Fischer (Oneida) barely had anything left by the end of the weekend; jewelers Sharon and Richard Abeyta’s (Santo Domingo Pueblo) tables were always crowded; jeweler Jolene Bird (Santo Domingo Pueblo) charmed the Eiteljorg store folks with her sleek and funky inlay jewelry.

    Shoppers crowd the artist tents.

    Visitors discovered delicate jewelry, colorful kachina carvings, musical instruments, large sculptures and more. The food vendors kept busy throughout the day, selling Indian tacos, papusas, ice cream and, our favorites to cool down in the afternoon, lavender lemonade and Melmosas.


    The weekend was picture perfect – until about 3:30 pm on Sunday when ominous clouds in the West threatened and we made the tough decision to close the market early for the safety of visitors, artists, volunteers and staff.

    As artists packed up their artwork, they hugged lingering visitors goodbye; wishing them a great year until they return next June to see them again.

     If you missed this year’s Indian Market and Festival, make sure to mark your calendar for next year’s festival: June 21-22, 2014.

    Please share your own stories about the 2013 Indian Market and Festival. And, if you haven’t had a chance to fill out our visitor survey, please do.

     
    Festivals and markets manager, Jaq Nigg wants to say a big THANK YOU to all of the artists who come from so far and who are so wonderful; to all of the volunteers who work so hard and keep smiling; to all of our vendors who are the best at what they do and have my back when I forget something; and to the rest of the Eiteljorg staff who make being the Indian Market grand poobah the best job in the entire museum. A special tip of the cap to Erinn Wold and Lisa Watt who are crazy good at being my team.


    Go comment!




  • Insider tips for Indian Market and Festival

    by Claire Quimby, Eiteljorg festivals and markets intern | Jun 18, 2013

    It’s the final countdown to Indian Market and Festival on Saturday and Sunday June 22 and 23, and the tempo around the Eiteljorg festivals department is rapidly gaining speed. Surrounded by all the behind-the-scenes preparations, I suppose I ought to feel like an expert, but I’ve never actually been to Indian Market. I know I’m not the only one, so I’ve gathered together some insider tips from our veteran market-goers to share.
    Indiana market welcome packets
    1. Consider attending the Friday Night
    Preview Party.

    The Best of Show exhibit alone is worth the ticket price. This is the only opportunity to see all of the prize winning art on display. The food by Kahn’s Catering is fantastic and it’s fun to visit with the artists and their families before the weekend hubbub starts. Like, really fun. They’re cool and funny and a little punchy from traveling. You’ll also be granted VIP early bird shopping on Saturday morning, which is no small thing when you’re racing to get to your favorite artist’s booth before someone else snatches up all the best pieces. (2012 preview party pictures below)
     

     

    Indian Market preview party

    2. Use the event program to plan your day.

     You don’t have to miss a performance or get lost on your way to buy food tickets if you use the schedule and map in this handy guide. There are also in-depth profiles of several of the top artists as well as our performers. And lots of pretty pictures.
     
    indian market 2013 cover

    3. Come early to stake out seats in the entertainment tent.

    Things get going first thing with Brian Buchannan, Chief of the Miami Indians of Indiana offering an official welcome and prayer to the artists and visitors. Then it’s nonstop storytelling, music and dance until the gates close. Checkout the jam-packed schedule here.  

    4. Did someone mention food?

     Everyone says Indian tacos are a must for lunch. Check. But I need to plan out what to eat the second day of market or, realistically, as a mid-afternoon snack on the first day. I was told to look no further than the Mexican food vendor whose tamales, quesadillas and pupusas are beyond excellent. Apparently, the kettle corn is awesome too. And I’m sure I won’t be able to deny the lure of Baskin Robbins ice cream on an Indiana day in June. From all reports, you can’t go wrong with any of the food. And, if you’re looking for a shady retreat in between activities, the historic shelterhouse on the east side of the park is a great place to hang out with a cold drink – especially a frozen café melmoso from Hubbard and Cravens.

     

    5. Take time to chat with the artists

    Indian Market isn’t just a place to buy art – it’s an opportunity to engage with people with different cultural backgrounds and interesting knowledge to share. Even if you’re not planning to shop, the artists are really neat people and are excited to talk with you about what they do.
     

    6. The Dogbane Family Activity Area isn’t just for kids

    The Eiteljorg’s crack team in the education and public programs departments has come up with fun museum-based art activities for all ages to make and take home. You can color guitar fans and make guitar pick pendants, create ledger art and create sgraffito “scratch art.”

     
     

    7. The Eiteljorg Museum

    Not only does the Eiteljorg building offer the comfort of air conditioning and flushing toilets, there’s a lot to do and see inside the museum – and it’s free with admission to Indian Market. Check out the Guitars! exhibit; visit our western galleries, the contemporary art galleries and the Native American galleries; climb aboard a real stagecoach; get something to eat in the café; get your official Indian Market and Festival t-shirt in the store.

     8. Finally: buy your tickets in advance!

    Okay, this is my own tip, and I’ve already revealed my newbie status, but even an amateur knows that you shouldn’t pay more than you have to. You’ll pay $2 less per ticket than if you buy them at the gate. That’s $2 more for artwork and food. You can get them online here or at Marsh stores. 
     

    Claire Quimby
    Eiteljorg festivals and markets intern

    Go comment!
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