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  • New Art 2.0 | Wendy Red Star

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 23, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015. 
    Wendy Red Star
    The (HUD), 2010
    Lithograph, edition 9/12
    30 x 22 ⅜ inches
    $835

    The main motive behind my work is humor and using humor as a tool to get to bigger underlying issues. I’m originally from Montana, and I grew up on the Crow Indian reservation in south-central Montana. I’m half Crow Indian and half Irish. I grew up immersed in Crow culture but with a dual perspective. Most of my art explores this experience from two worlds and some of the issues that occur within that territory.

    Wendy Red Star (Crow, born 1981) is an installation artist who received her bachelor of fine arts degree from Montana State University and her master of fine arts degree from the University of California at Los Angeles, both in sculpture. In her work, Wendy, who is a 2009 Eiteljorg Fellow, combines her own ethnic and gender identities with conventional and stereotypical ways of representing them. She resides in Portland, Oregon.
     
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  • New Art 2.0 | Lillian Pitt

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 17, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015. 
    Echoes from the ancient past
    Echoes From the Ancient Past, 2013
    Monotype, edition 1/1
    15 x 20 inches
    $715

    Long regarded as one of the Northwest’s most beloved contemporary Native American artists, Lillian Pitt (Wasco/Yakama/Warm Springs) grew up on the Warm Springs Reservation in central Oregon. Her mother’s Wasco family lived near now-submerged Celilo Falls, and her father’s Yakima relatives lived across the river near the pictograph of Tsaglaglal, or She-Who-Watches.

    Pitt, who became an artist in her mid-30s, began with mask making. She became interested in, and gained expertise, in Japanese raku and anagama firing methods. The pictographs, petroglyphs, and legends of her ancestors are the foundation of her visual language. Pitt works in several media, including bronze, glass, and prints.

    Ancestors
    Ancestors, 2006
    Monotype, edition 1/1
    15 x 20 inches
    $765

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  • New Art 2.0 | Dale Chihuly

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 16, 2014
    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015. 
    Chihuly

    Crow’s Shadow Basket, 2008
    Lithograph with acrylic, edition 22/1000
    37 x 25 inches
    $2,880

    Dale Chihuly is a world-renowned glass blower and multimedia artist whose work is in more than 200 museum collections worldwide. He has received many awards, including 12 honorary doctorates and two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Chihuly created this edition at Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts studios in 2007. He donated ten prints from the edition to sell at full retail price, with all proceeds going to a Dale Chihuly Scholarship Fund for young, emerging Native American artists.
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  • New Art 2.0 | Introducing Corwin “Corky” Clairmont

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art, and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 09, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.

    Banana Polar Bear
    Banana Polar Bear, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22 ⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    Our Indian communities have thousands of years of history that need to be recognized and celebrated. We have many stories yet to tell from the past and the present as we are still here. - Corwin "Corky" Clairmong (Salish Kootenai)

    Corwin "Corky" Clairmont was born at the St. Ignatius Mission on the Flathead Reservation in Montana. In 1984, after living in Los Angeles for 14 years, Clairmont returned to the Flathead Reservation, where he lives and works today. Clairmont is part of an important group of Native American artists who use their cultural experiences and background in combination with techniques such as printmaking and photography to bring attention to the traditions and challenges that are part of the lives of Native people and their communities. Clairmont is a 2003 Eiteljorg Fellow and has exhibited his work across the U.S. His work is included in many public and private collections, including the Eiteljorg Museum’s permanent collection.

    Waiting for the ice
    Waiting for the Ice, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    More about Corky
    Corky is a celebrated contemporary artist, combining his experience as a native person and tribal member with a post-modernist view of the realities of life as indigenous people struggle to retain their identities and sovereignty into the 21st century. He is also a teacher, mentor and a community activist, and lives in Ronan. A member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Corky has been the art director at Salish Kootenai College since 1984. Previously, he was an instructor and printmaking department head at Otis/Parsons Art Institute in LA.

    Corky holds a BA from MSU, did a graduate fellowship at San Fernando State University and received an MFA from California State University at Los Angeles. His work has been exhibited from coast to coast and around the world, including Germany and New Zealand, and has been reviewed by the New York Times. He also designed the cover and emblem for the American Indian Library Association and a large granite warrior memorial for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation in 2007.

    Through the years, he has served on many professional boards, curated and juried many art shows, and he has received a Ford Foundation grant and NEA and MAC grants. Corky was also awarded the 2008 Montana Governor’s Arts Award for Visual Art. (Source: www.Montana.gov)
     
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  • New Art 2.0 | Exhibit and sale opens Saturday, Nov. 1

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt and Ashley Holland | Oct 29, 2014
    Bird Hat 

    Rick Bartow (Wiyot of Northern California), Bird Hat, 2013, monoprint, edition 1/1, 30 1/8 x 22 1/2 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    Collector. Patron. Donor. These are a few of the words museum insiders like to use. They sound impressive. How can someone become associated with one or all of these words? How do they become more than words that give meaning to people’s lives, both personally and for the public? It is art, but is it good? Who makes those determinations? How? It was these questions and ideas that led to the creation of New Art 2.0.

    Feddersen and Lavadour
    Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes) and James Lavadour (Walla Walla), Untitled (Amongst Friends series), 2010, monotype, edition 1/1, 15 x 22 3/8 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    The New Art of the West series is not a new concept. It is the exhibition that helped to establish the Eiteljorg contemporary collection and in particular planted the seed of interest in Native American contemporary work that has become the hallmark of the contemporary collection. The series promoted cultural variety and diverse traditions as well as time-honored practices in landscape, portraiture, and still life. New Art 2.0 takes its cue from the exhibition that produced nine shows and catalogues and highlighted the best emerging and established contemporary artists working in the West today.

    Eva Lake, Golden
    Eva Lake (American, born 1956), Golden no. 2, 2012, lithograph, edition 14/14, 30 x 30 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.
     
    We are grateful to the patrons and collectors who supported our initial efforts at collecting during the museum’s 25 years. As the museum looks to the next 25, it also ushers in a new generation of patrons and collectors with New Art 2.0. This next exhibition is a fitting complement to the collecting opportunities found in Quest for the West and our annual Indian Market and Festival.

    Working in partnership with Crow’s Shadow Institute of Art , with a little help from Todd Bockley Gallery in Minneapolis, Minnesota, New Art 2.0 includes prints by Native and non-Native contemporary artists and features many artists whose work is already in the Eiteljorg permanent contemporary collection. Native artists Joe Feddersen, Marie Watt, Jim Denomie, Truman Lowe, and Kay WalkingStick, to name a few, are coupled with non-Native artists such as Dale Chihuly and Storm Tharp.

    Damien Gilley, Everything Incorporated
    Damien Gilley, Everything Incorporated, 2014, lithograph, edition 1/12, 22 x 30 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    So to answer a few questions new patrons and collectors may have, owning artwork creates an affinity and affiliation with artists and organizations, and a curiosity and empathy for broadening world views. Patronage at any level indicates a responsibility and embodies idealism toward humanity and the musing of mere mortals.

    Can one piece of art really incite so much? We have seen it happen again and again. Let it happen to you.

     New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000. 
     
     

     

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