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  • Tweens and teens to rock out at the Eiteljorg this Saturday afternoon

    by Girls Rock! Indianapolis guest blogger | Aug 02, 2013


    Girls Rock! Indianapolis recently completed its fourth camp season. The week-long camp culminated in a showcase of over 70 girls between the ages of 8 and 16 singing and rocking out on guitar, drum and bass in front of a packed crowd of almost 400 fans. Many of the girls had never picked up an instrument before attending Girls Rock! camp, but their pride in showing off their new found abilities made that theater electric.

    While it may be tough for some people to list more than a handful of influential female musicians, women have left an indelible mark on the heart of rock 'n' roll. Early female rockers Wanda Jackson, Maybelle Carter, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe heavily influenced more iconic male musicians including Chuck Berry, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Elvis Presley.

    Providing campers with an understanding of women's place in music history is one of the focuses of Girls Rock! camp  That's one of the many reasons that we are so excited to partner with the Eitlejorg for Girls Rock! Day at the museum  on Saturday, Aug. 3. 







    We've seen first-hand how getting girls excited about music and self-expression builds their confidence and influences their interactions with others. In a world that's filled with media messages that tell girls how they should look, what they should wear, and how they should think, the empowerment that music gives them is more important now than ever.  

    The Eitlejorg's "Guitars! Roundups to Rockers" includes a number of exhibit pieces that are of interest to female rockers including guitars owned by Patsy Montana, who was the first country music female to have a milion-selling hit single, and riot grrrl band Sleater Kinney

    Girls Rock! Day at the Eiteljorg runs from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Aug. 3. There will be a musical "petting zoo," complete with guitar, bass and a drum kit for hands on experimentation guided by Girls Rock! volunteers. Stop by, try out the instruments, and form your own flash band. During the afternoon, Girls Rock! volunteers and campers will perform and be available to talk about camp, its history, and upcoming events. Visitors can also make their own rock 'n' roll inspired buttons as a take-away to remember the day.

    Girls Rock! Indianapolis is a non-profit organization, founded in 2009, dedicated to building positive self-esteem in girls and encouraging creative expression through music. Our music education programs provide girls with an oPpportunity to participate in an environment that fosters leadership, encourages social change, and cultivates a supportive community of female peers and mentors. The Girls Rock! program began in Portland, Oregon and similar programs now run in Austin, Seattle, Atlanta, Houston, Chicago, Paris, Iceland, Brazil, and other cities many other cities in countries around the globe.  

    For more information, visit girlsrockindy.org.

    Photos courtesy: Paul D'Andrea, Sarah Boutwell and s.Jane Mils.
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  • Eiteljorg employee makes a difference just by playing the banjo

    by Jordan Stout, Eiteljorg visitor experience assistant | Jun 10, 2013


    This banjo - usually housed in a storage drawer - helped a 9-year-old boy with disabilities celebrate one of his best birthdays ever.

    A little boy came to the Eiteljorg Saturday afternoon. Turned out I knew his favorite songs on the banjo, "Baby Beluga" and "Old Dan Tucker." When I played for him he danced until he burst into tears from laughter. Then when I asked him if he wanted to play he didn't take the pause needed to say yes before picking it up and starting to figure out how. At this latest - his mother froze, looking shocked. I hadn't noticed until then that the boy had limited use of his arms and wrists. His mother never imagined he could do something like play an instrument, but there he was playing away and laughing. So I quickly ran to grab others and an hour later I still couldn't have pried my ukulele away from him if I dared.

    Turned out, Saturday was his birthday. He had just turned nine. He said it was one of his best. He was unhappy to leave the museum but his mother said he and their family had a wonderful experience.

    Happy birthday little dude! Come back to the museum anytime and we'll jam to any song you want.
    The Eiteljorg later received a wonderful email from the boy's mother - grateful about her son's experience and his time with Jordan:

    "...Our family met one of your employees named Jordan Stout. Mr Stout not only wowed us with his musical talents on the banjo and uke but he was patient, informative and kind with my kids, one of which has a disability called Williams Syndrome. My husband and I both agree, meeting Mr Stout and being entertained and educated by him, was definitely the highlight for our family's trip to your museum..."

    Jordan Stout (pictured above) is a visitor experience assistant at the Eiteljorg. He has a deep love for playing music, especially ukulele and banjo. He enjoys the opportunity to play whenever possible for families who visit the Museum's RB Annis Experience located on the Canal level.

    Each Saturday from noon to 2 p.m., children and adults can take free guitar lessons at the Eiteljorg. If you don't own an instrument, no problem. We have 19 guitars and ukekeles from which to choose in our Guitars! corral. And don't forget to check out Guitars! Roundups to Rockers, where more than 100 instruments are on exhibit, including this 2013 Cutaway Tenor Ukulele (loan courtesy of Mya-Moe Ukeleles).

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  • The mating advantage of male musicians - Why all guys should play guitar

    by Zach Brown, Eiteljorg marketing/PR intern | Jun 05, 2013

    As a 20-something single guy, I’ve heard the old adage of “chicks dig a man who can sing” plenty of times. But does playing an instrument or musical ability really make a man more attractive to an interested woman? According to a study in France, it actually does, and later on I’ll tell you where to get free guitar lessons and be on your way to winning that lucky lady’s heart.

    In this particular experiment, a 20-year-old man was instructed to approach 300 women on the shopping streets of a medium-sized French city (population roughly 70,000) and ask for their phone number. The man was carrying a guitar case, a sports bag or nothing at all. The study showed that 31 percent of women gave the man their phone number when he was carrying the guitar case, while only 9 percent gave their number when he held the sports bag. When the man was empty-handed, 14 percent complied with his request.

    The conductors of this research hypothesized that the guitar case condition would yield a more favorable response from the women whom the man approached. Their hypothesis was not only supported by the results, but by me as well.

    There are plenty of ways that guys use to capture the heart and attention of lady, whether he’s good with music, sports, animals or kids (kudos to the guy who brought his son on the season premiere of ABC’s The Bachelorette). However, musical ability is special because it exudes a unique combination of confidence, compassion and intellect. In addition, the musician or “rock star” image is appealing because some woman my associate it with wealth and status (PSmag.com).

    I know what you might be thinking now: “What about sports guys? They get wealth and status, too!” Indeed they do, but the ability to play guitar lasts longer than the ability to throw a football or dunk a basketball. Athletes may also have the task of dispelling the wildly inaccurate “dumb jock” stereotype, a generalization to which I refuse to subscribe.

    The bottom line is that a music guy may be more likely to make a deep, emotional connection than someone who can’t play a note to save his life (i.e. - Me). According to Tom Jacobs of Pacific Standard, ladies see a musician as someone who is potentially willing to practice and work at something. To me, this could mean willingness to put in the effort for a relationship.
    So gentlemen, if you have musical ability, use it. You can thank me later. And to those of you who don’t, never fret (10 Cool Points if you got the guitar pun), there’s still time to learn! You can get guitar lessons from 12-2 p.m., every Saturday during the run of Guitars! Roundups to Rockers, at the Eiteljorg by Benito DiBartoli (pictured here) of the band Black Voodoo. He's an expert player who works with anyone interested in learning. Lessons are free with the price of admission. And the Museum has plenty of extra guitars if you don't have your own! Don’t forget to check out our Guitars: Roundups to Rockers exhibit as well.


    Zach Brown is an Eiteljorg marketing/PR intern and a senior at Ball State University. He is single.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    References:
    "Men's Music Ability and Attractiveness to Women in a Real-life Courtship
    Context." Psychology of Music (2013): 1-5. 1 May 2013. 28 May 2013

    Jacobs, Tom. "The Mating Advantage of Male Musicians." Pacific Standard. Psmag.com, 6 May 2013. 28 May 2013.

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  • Learn the history of the American guitar in a special presentation

    by User Not Found | Apr 26, 2013

    Mark your calendars for Sunday, May 5! That’s when C.F. Martin & Co. historian/guitar expert, Dick Boak, will take participants through an interactive journey of the history of the American guitar. Dick’s presentation will showcase the 180-year-old Martin company, as well as the evolution of its acoustic guitars.

                                                  (Left) 1834 Martin Stauffer, (Right) 1945 Martin D 45

    The presentation will be supplemented with demonstrative guitar "vignettes" of appropriate period pieces on an assortment of evolutionary Martin designs by acoustic guitarist Steve Reno of Reno's Music in Fishers, IN.

    Dick has been inextricably intertwined with C.F. Martin, in Nazareth, PA, for more than 35 years. He established and managed Martin’s Artist Relations and Limited Edition guitar program which produced signature models for more than 100 legendary artists, including Eric Clapton, Paul Simon, Jimmy Buffett, Dave Matthews, Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Tom Petty, John Mayer and Sting. He is an accomplished guitarmaker, woodworker, musician, illustrator and writer. Following the discussion, Dick will be available to sign copies of three books, Martin Guitar Masterpieces, Martin Guitars: A History and Martin Guitars: A Technical Reference.

    Martin acoustic guitars continue to be prized for their tone, consistency, quality and attention to handcrafted detail. Professional and amateur musicians in every category of music hold Martin guitars in high esteem.

    The list of Martin players, past and present, reads like a "Who’s Who" of the musical world and includes legends such as Elvis Presley, Paul McCartney, Eric Clapton, Hank Williams, Sr., Jimmy Buffett, Stephen Stills, Neil Young, Joan Baez, Paul Simon, Sting, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash, and countless others. In addition to guitarmaking, Martin is also one of the world’s largest manufacturers of musical strings.

    C.F. Martin & Co. was founded by Christian Frederick Martin Sr. in 1833. It remains the oldest surviving maker of guitars in the world.

    So, whether you’re a self-proclaimed guitar geek, novice string strummer, or just a fan of music history, come join us! Sunday May 5 is sure to be a very special afternoon with a man whose heart and hands have had a mighty influence on some of American’s favorite riffmeisters.

    While you're here, check out Guitars! Roundups to Rockers. More than 100 guitars—owned by greats including Roy Rogers, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, Buddy Holly and others— are on display.

    Photos for this post are courtesy of C. F. Martin Archives.


    DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg Public Relations Manager
    Contact me at dperry@eiteljorg.com for interviews with Dick Boak or Steve Reno. Follow me on Twitter @DeShongPerry.

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