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  • Olympian Billy Mills To Share His Life Story at the Eiteljorg, 1 p.m., Sat. Nov. 8

    by Martha Hill, PhD | Nov 03, 2014

     
    Billy Mills’ (Oglala Lakota) life has been on an incredible journey: one that started on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota in 1938. That journey has taken him from the reservation to the medal platform at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and beyond.

    On Saturday, Nov.  8, 2014, at 1 p.m., the Eiteljorg Museum will proudly present Running Bravely Through Life - a screening of the film, Running Brave and an inspirational session with Billy Mills. The film chronicles Mills’ early life and journey to the Olympic Games. Following the film, Billy and his wife Pat discuss what it takes to discover your passion and fulfill your dreams. Mills will also sign his book, Wokini: A Lakota Journey to Happiness and Self-Understanding, following the program.

    Running Bravely Through Life will afford community members the opportunity to hear from a man who had a dream and a goal and focused his young life toward achieving that goal. At the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, Mills took gold in the 10,000 meter race. Considered one of the greatest upsets in Olympic history, Mills outran several international track greats to become the first and, to date, only American to win gold in the 10,000 meter event, while also setting an Olympic record.

    Mills’ early journey is the subject of the 1983 film Running Brave. The audience will be introduced to the young man who was orphaned by the time he was 12 and sent off to boarding school. It wasn’t until high school in Lawrence, Kansas that he discovered he had a passion for running. He earned a full athletic scholarship to the University of Kansas. But Mills’ life was difficult. He even considered suicide and related, “he felt broken by the racism around [him and looked] toward Native American virtues and values to overcome that.”
    “Though, his

    Running Brave is the story of a journey to the Olympics. However his journey did not end with winning gold. That was just the first step. Today he works closely with American Indian youth across the country through his foundation, Running Strong for American Indian Youth. He is an inspirational speaker with the message of looking inside yourself, discovering your passion, working hard and achieving success and happiness. This is the message and the challenge that he will give to the community in Running Bravely Through Life.

    Billy Mills with gold medalRunning Bravely Through Life
    Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014
    1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

    *This event is part of the 2014 Spirit & Place Festival, which runs from Nov. 7-16, 2014.

    Thank you to our sponsors: Citizens Energy Group, IUPUI, NCAA and Purdue University
     

     

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  • Navajo Rugs, Buckaroo Bash and a Halloween Event Just for Adults | October Calendar of Events

    by Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art | Oct 02, 2014

     October gives visitors plenty of chances to learn, play and party at the Eiteljorg!
      

     
    Dawn Dark Mountain (Oneida of Wisconsin), Beneath the Ever Growing Tree 

    Saturday
    Oct. 4
    1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

    Meet Artist-in-Residence Dawn Dark Mountain (Oneida of Wisconsin)
    Dawn specializes in transparent watercolors. In addition to her paintings, she creates linoleum and wood-block prints that are then completed with watercolor. Visitors can learn about Dawn’s culture and watch as she demonstrates her techniques.
     

    Navajo Rug Auction at the Eiteljorg Museum

    Saturday
    Oct 4
    Navajo Rug Auction

    9:30-11:00 a.m.    Preview 
    11:30 a.m.            Auction Begins
    Navajo rugs in traditional and contemporary designs from the R.B. Burnham & Co. Trading Post in Arizona will be auctioned. Prices range from less than $100 to $10,000. 
      
    Presse_When_Thou_Art_Gone
    Quest artist Heide Presse, When Thou Art Gone to Western Land, 2014, Oil on Linen, 26 x 26 inches
    Sunday
    Oct. 5
    Quest for the West® Art Show and Sale closes at 5 p.m.  


    DG House (Cherokee of NE Alabama), Ancestors Yet to Come
     
    Saturdays
    Oct 11, 18 and 25

    1 p.m. – 4 p.m. 

    Meet Artist-in-Residence DG House (Cherokee of NE Alabama)
    Contemporary Native American artist, DG House, will share her art and culture. Guests may also watch her demonstrate her mixed media and painting techniques.
     
    Saturday
    Oct. 18
    10 a.m. – Noon
    Ledger Art Workshop
    Join artist-in-residence, DG House, for this one-of-a-kind workshop and learn about the history of ledger art explained through the story of the Battle of Little Bighorn. With DG’s guidance, participants will create their own personal ledger art to take home. Materials Fee: Non-Members $12. To pre-register by Oct.11, call 317.275.1370.



    Saturday
    Oct. 18
    7 p.m.
    Leather and Lace |The 17th Annual
    Buckaroo Bash
    The Buckaroo Bash is one of the Eiteljorg’s biggest fundraisers. Proceeds from the event purchase art supplies for visiting students and support education programs such as artists in residence, gallery interpreters, and Eiteljorg Museum to the Classrooms: Stories of Diversity. RSVP by Oct. 10. by calling 317.275.1333. Price: $200


    Day of the Dead/ Dia de los Muertos at the Eiteljorg Museum

    Saturday
    Oct. 25

    11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    Day of the Dead/Dia de los Muertos (photo attached)
    This year NOPAL (an Indianapolis Latino arts and culture organization), is partnering with the Eiteljorg to provide an upbeat experience during the Day of the Dead celebration. The event will include festive and thoughtful ofrendas (altars that honor deceased loved ones); art created by local artists; a mercado; and a Katrina fashion show. Entertainment will be provided by NOPAL Musicians and Anderson Ballet Folklorico. Guests may visit with New Mexican tin artist Richard Gabriel, Jr., and local contemporary papel picado artist Beatriz Schlebecker. Guests will get to create their own papel picado and tin ornament to take home.

    Friday
    Oct. 31
    8 p.m. – Midnight

    Freiteljorg with the ICO and DJ Kyle Long (an adult Halloween party)
    Celebrate the opening of New Art 2.0 by partying until the witching hour in your most haunting attire. Enjoy grown-up trick-or-treating, while grooving to an unforgettable live mash-up of modern DJ experimental sounds featuring DJ Kyle Long and the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. Costumes mimicking Native Americans or people of other races will not be tolerated. Price: $20 for non Agave members, $30 at the door.
     
     
     Rick Bartow (Wiyot tribe of Northern California), Bird Hat, 2013, monoprint, edition 1/1, 30 1/8 x 22 1/2, Print courtesy: Crow's Shadow Press, Photography by Hadley Fruits. 

    Saturday
    Nov 1

    New Art 2.0 opens
    Dates: Nov. 1 –Jan. 4, 2015

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints by contemporary Native and Western artists, many of them Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellows. It is a blend of landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Eighty limited-edition prints will be on exhibit. Prices range from $500 - $4,000. 

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  • The Eiteljorg and The Indianapolis Opera Team Up Saturday March 8

    by James Caraher, Indianapolis Opera artistic director and conductor | Mar 03, 2014

    On Friday, March 21 and Sunday, March 23, the Indianapolis Opera will present Giacomo Puccini's The Girl of the Golden West at Butler University's Clowes Memorial Hall.  This Saturday, the  March 8, members of the Indianapolis Opera Ensemble will present a live performance. Then, a lively discussion on The Operatic West | Myths and Realities of the 19th Century West will take place, starring both Eiteljorg and Indianapolis Opera experts. The Eiteljorg performance and discussion is free with museum admission.

    Indianapolis Opera artistic director and conductor James Caraher blogs about the upcoming opera and tells us why some of the music in it landed in a court of law.

    Girl of the Golden West stage pictureEveryone loves Giacomo Puccini and everyone loves a good Western! A handsome outlaw in disguise, the sheriff in hot pursuit, and a garter-snapping, pistol-packing, poker-playing heroine who will do anything to save the man she loves. Giacomo Puccini was fascinated by the American West, and California during the Gold Rush was the perfect setting for one of his most memorable leading ladies. (Source: Indianapolisopera.org)

    Girl of the Golden West
    holds a very special place in the long list of operas that Puccini composed, coming right after Madame Butterfly. It is unlike any other, combining the intimacy and romance of La Boheme with the grandeur of Turandot, all set in the American West during the gold rush. First performed in 1910, it was the first "commissioned" opera by the Metropolitan Opera, and was also it's first world premier. The opening night performance of Dick Johnson, the tenor lead, was sung by non other than Enrico Caruso, and the conductor for the evening was Arturo Toscanini, with Puccini himself in the audience! Talk about a star-studded opening. While this is one of Puccini's lesser-known operas, audience members will be surprised to hear some snippets of music that sounds surprisingly familiar. During the Act 2 tenor aria "Quello che tacete," there are several measures which can also be heard almost note for note in "Music of the Night" from Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom of the Opera! It could be an accidental similarity, but the Puccini folks decided to sue Mr. Lloyd Webber for plagurism. The outcome was an out of court settlement. I'll leave it up to you to decide whether or not it was an accident!

    About Conductor James Caraher
    Often referred to as “the singers’ conductor,” Caraher is a master at holding all the reins of the many forces of grand opera while seemingly able to clearly communicate his musical desires with each performer. Caraher frequently serves as guest conductor for other symphonies and opera companies and has lent his talents to Opera Company of Philadelphia, Kentucky Opera, Opera Memphis, Buffalo Opera and Nashville Opera. He devotes much of his time to the development of young singers by directing the Indianapolis Opera Ensemble, the Indianapolis Opera Young Artist Program. He lives in Indianapolis with his wife and two children.

    Indianapolis Opera at the Eiteljorg
    The Operatic West | Myths and Realities of the 19th Century West - A collaboration with the Indianapolis Opera
    Saturday, Mar. 8
    1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
    Eiteljorg vice president and chief curatorial officer James Nottage, the Indianapolis Opera’s artistic director and conductor James Caraher and guest stage director John Hoomes discuss "The Operatic West: Myths and Realities of the 19th Century West."  Members of the Indianapolis Opera Ensemble will present a live performance prior to the discussion. This event is free with paid museum admission. To learn more about the Indianapolis Opera and to purchase tickets for The Girl of the Golden West, visit www.indyopera.org.

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  • Ansel Adams | How the famed photographer got his start

    by Jonathan Spaulding, Guest curator for Ansel Adams exhibit | Feb 24, 2014


    Ansel Adams, photograph by Jim Alinder

    In the spring of 1916, the fourteen-year-old Ansel was in bed with a cold. To cheer his spirits during another of his many illnesses, his aunt gave him a copy of James M. Hutchings’s In the Heart of the Sierras, published in 1886 and one of the classic travel accounts of the region. The boy lay mesmerized by Hutchings’s romantic tales of adventure among the towering walls of the Yosemite Valley. The family had been discussing where to spend their upcoming summer vacation. In years past they had gone to Puget Sound or down the coast to Santa Cruz, but for Ansel there was now no option. They simply had to go to this incredible place called Yosemite.

    Soon after their arrival, Ansel’s parents gave him a Kodak No. I Box Brownie camera. After a brief lesson on its simple controls, he was off to explore the area. On foot, camera in hand, he traversed the valley with characteristic hyperkineticism. He took snapshots with no conscious artfulness, only a desire to record what caught his eye. At one point he clambered atop a rotting stump to shoot across the valley floor to the cliffs above. As he leaned back to take the picture, the stump gave way, sending him plummeting to earth. On the way down he managed to trip the shutter.

    The next day he took the film into the valley’s local camera shop, Pillsbury Pictures, Inc. When he came back to pick it up, Arthur Pillsbury himself presented him with the processed photos. Pillsbury inquired about one shot on the roll in particular. How had it happened to be made upside down? Had Adams held the camera inverse over his head for a better angle? Ansel explained his airborne photograph, adding that it was just a matter of luck that it had been shot at a perfect 180 degrees. Pillsbury gave the boy a skeptical look; here was an odd one indeed.

    Following his first Yosemite trip, Ansel Adams returned home to San Francisco and continued to use his camera. Because of his burning desire to learn more about photography, he went to work part-time as a “darkroom monkey” for neighbor Frank Dittman, who owned a photo-finishing operation.


    Ansel Adams in darkroom, photograph by Jim Alinder

    Ansel was well received by Dittman, the three printers, and the six delivery boys, although his odd ways provoked some ribbling. The skinny, hyperactive Ansel, with his crooked nose, his long words, and his stories about Yosemite, seemed an amusing character. They called him “Ansel Yosemite Adams.” He took it all well, Dittman remembered, and appeared to find the pranks played on him funny, too. He “picked up cussing real fast,” and Dittman thought the job was a good antidote to the music lessons he believed were just another example of the coddling the boy got at home. Dittman recognized that Ansel was in his element in the darkroom. “It came natural to him. I could see right off he was good. Whatever the kid done was done thorough.”

    Adams was fascinated by photographic equipment and begun to prowl the local camera shops to investigate the rows of lenses, tripods, lights, chemicals, printing papers, cameras and film. He read the amateur photographic magazines and whatever technical handbooks he could find. At a local camera club he met W.E. Dassonville, a manufacturer of fine printing papers and an accomplished photographer. Dassonville knew many of the Bay Area photographers and gave Adams an introduction to the practice of the medium as a fine art.

    - From the biography Ansel Adams and the American Landscape by Jonathan Spaulding’s biography contains an extensive bibliography of works by and about Ansel Adams. His detailed descriptions of Adams’ photographs, projects, and relationships offer compelling insights into the man who has come to represent the American West.

    Meet Jonathan Spaulding this Saturday at the Eiteljorg during opening weekend of the Ansel Adams exhibit.

    Saturday, Mar. 1, 2014
    1:30 p.m.
    A Conversation with curator Jonathan Spaulding
    Join Jonathan Spaulding for a behind-the-scenes discussion of Ansel Adams’ life and work - See more at: http://www.eiteljorg.org/interact/blog/eitelblog/2014/02/19/ansel-adams-influence-and-inspiration-in-over-80-photographs#sthash.b17D76QF.dpuf
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  • From Slave to Cowboy | Nat Love's story comes to life this Saturday at the Eiteljorg

    by Eiteljorg Museum Public Programs | Feb 17, 2014
    Join us at 1:30 p.m., this Saturday, Feb. 22, to experience storyteller Rochel Coleman as he recreates the life and times of African American cowboy Nat Love in a series of stories based on Love’s autobiography. 


    Nat Love, born a slave in Tennessee, went west at the age of 15 to seek freedom and equal opportunity. He earned the name "Deadwood Dick" on July 4, 1876 by being the best cowboy in a competition which included roping, riding and shooting. Nat took on all comers and was the best at every event in the competition. He was also called "Red River Dick" when he was instrumental in heading cattle drives from Texas to Kansas. He had the distinguished position of chief brand reader, which ranked him as an outstanding cattleman. He was one of the most prominent black cowboys in the early history of the West. The attitude regarding race relations between cowboys were non-existent at that time. For most people, a cowboy was a cowboy. "Deadwood Dick" was a bronco-buster, sharpshooter and one of the most trusted cowboys of his era. In his days as a cowboy, he was befriended by many of the noted ‘bad men’ of the time, such as Billy the Kid, the James Brothers, and Bat Masterson. He was also adopted by more than one Indian tribe.

    About Storyteller Rochel Coleman
    Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, Rochel started singing professionally at

    the age of nine. With the Men and Boys’ Choir of Christ Church Cathedral and then with the Berkshire Boys’ Choir, he distinguished himself as a soloist, performing with Pablo Cassals, King’s College Choir, and the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood. Opening the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Leonard Bernstein’s Mass, he had his first taste of acting. He toured with the show for two years, ending the run at Lincoln Center in New York City. Rochel continued to study music and drama at Indiana University and toured several operas under the direction of the Indiana School of Music. From St. Richard’s School, to Brebeuf Preparatory School, and finally at Colorado College, he continued to have an interest in drama, participating in regional productions. Rochel worked on a number of daytime dramas. When the opportunity came to study at Trinity Repertory Conservatory, he moved to Providence, RI. Rochel continues to expand his achievements through writing and directing.

    Source for this post:
    Supplemental curriculum guide for teachers for Rochel Coleman's performance of "I, Nat Love | The Story of Deadwood Dick."

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