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  • Popular Indy cover band My Yellow Rickshaw to perform Wednesday, July 11 at the Eiteljorg Museum for Summer Under the Sails concert series

    by Rachel Foley, marketing and communications intern | Jul 05, 2018

    myyellowrickshaw
    The band My Yellow Rickshaw performs at the Eiteljorg on July 11

    On Wednesday, July 11, the band My Yellow Rickshaw will perform for the summer-long Summer Under The Sails concert series that’s back for a fourth season at the Eiteljorg Museum.  Every Wednesday evening from 6 to 8 p.m. through Aug. 1, music acts will perform concerts under The Sails along the downtown canal. The concerts are free, and guests are invited to sit back and relax under The Sails, enjoy appetizers from the Museum Café and grab a drink from the cash bar. Admission to the museum, including The Reel West exhibit, is free from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesdays during the concert series.

    The cover band My Yellow Rickshaw is known for its variety – playing popular Top 40 music covers from the ‘50s to the present. A quick search on YouTube will spawn covers of wedding staples such as “Shut Up and Dance” to fast fiddle classics such as “The Devil Went Down to Georgia.” The band started as a three-piece ensemble of Nathan Klatt, Eric Maitlen and Steve Hueber, all of whom grew up on the same street together in Portland, Ind. and spent their free time playing music.  After leaving their small town and getting through school, the guys – then in their mid to late 20s – made the decision to start a band. “Let’s sing some ‘chick-songs,’ be goofy and make fun of ourselves, and get serious about not being serious,’” said Nathan Klatt, lead man of the band as he recalled the early motivation of the band.

    Nathan Klatt (vocals, fiddle, mandolin) sat down to share more about the band with the Eiteljorg Blog. He is eager to share stories from his full-time work as a singer and entertainer and pointed out that, “Klatt spelled backwards is ‘Talk.’” His Klatt-isms and jokes make it clear why My Yellow Rickshaw has amassed such a regular presence at Indianapolis gigs through their humor, style and “joyful chaos” on stage.

    In the early years, the three bandmates performed at bars and coffee shops. Klatt was the front man playing the fiddle and leading the vocals, while Maitlen and Hueber accompanied with percussion and keyboard. “We weren’t that good musically yet, but we knew how to entertain and connect, make the audience feel like a part of the show and make fun of ourselves,” Klatt said.

    Nathan Klatt













    Nathan Klatt

    The unusual name of the band, My Yellow Rickshaw, was inspired during a long-term mission trip Maitlen and Hueber took to India. While based there, they had befriended the driver of a yellow rickshaw named Gopal Singh, and decided to dedicate the name of their band to Singh and his rickshaw.

    The band’s name aside, My Yellow Rickshaw’s ability to bring fun and humor to a set list of music has become their biggest appeal. As a cover band, they frequently are booked at weddings across the city. In a time where the standard and more cost-efficient way of entertainment is to hire a DJ with any song ready to go, a cover band such as My Yellow Rickshaw has to stand out.

    Klatt believes that anything has the ability to entertain and connect an audience for an evening. “I don’t care if it’s a band, a DJ, a magician, a fire-breather. Whatever you have that can keep people’s attention and draw everyone in and brings an atmosphere, warmth, radiation and joy – that will have people saying years later, ‘That was awesome!’ – do it. When you have real musicians playing real music, interacting with the crowd, drawing people in and pointing out someone doing a ridiculously stupid dance move, those moments (are when) you start adding a personal touch to it,” Klatt said.

    The band of three has now become a band of seven rotating members. Maitlen and Hueber have since moved on to other projects – and now Jeremy Lee (drums and percussion), Jonas Miller (keyboards, vocals and harmonica), Ryan Fitzpatrick (drums and percussion), Rick Stump (guitar and vocals), Cory Carleton (electric and upright bass, vocals) and Steven Lott (audio engineer, photographer and public relations) join Klatt. Despite their expanded ensemble, My Yellow Rickshaw performs with no more than four people on stage. “We can do a duo or trio, but we’ve found that four is the right number to create the energy we want to get and create the full sound we need,” Klatt said.

    In terms of sound, My Yellow Rickshaw performs Top 40 hits from every decade and genre. Most bands throughout the Summer Under The Sails series have brought a folk and Americana style, whereas My Yellow Rickshaw invites the crowd to dance and sing along. “The summer concert series looks for a variety of bands, as musical tastes tend to vary. MYR plays newer hits that you can sing along with, which definitely added to the series this summer,” said Sandy Schmidt, public programs coordinator here at the Eiteljorg.

    To learn more about upcoming concerts for #SummerUnderTheSails please visit http://bit.ly/2Mst3ZK.

     









  • Favorite artists return and new features enliven the 26th annual Indian Market & Festival

    by | | Jun 08, 2018

    2017 Indian Market & Festival

    Indian Market is a fascinating opportunity to meet Native artists from many cultures across the U.S. and Canada.

    One of the region’s most memorable art and cultural experiences, the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival will be celebrated the weekend of June 23-24. This year will feature lively performances, talented artists, a new Market Morning Breakfast on Saturday morning and much more.

    Now in its 26th year, Indian Market and Festival is a fascinating opportunity for visitors to meet artists from more than 50 Native American cultures from across the U.S. and Canada. Seasoned art collectors and first-time market-goers alike will appreciate the personal interactions and wide variety of artwork represented, including jewelry, pottery, basketry, carvings, sculptures, paintings, prints and other fine art.

    Held on the beautiful Eiteljorg grounds, Indian Market and Festival features artists’ booths both outside and inside the museum. Cultural experiences are a big part of the weekend, and this year’s live performances include music, dancing and storytelling.

    “Visitors often say Indian Market and Festival broadens their cultural horizons by allowing them and their families to experience Native American art for the first time and meet the exceptional artists,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “Experienced art collectors always enjoy the opportunity to purchase Native art close to home without traveling out West. Non-collectors bask in the memorable market and festival experience. And returning artists appreciate the Hoosier hospitality and the opportunity to get reacquainted with old friends and meet new collectors and fans.”

    Indian Market jewelry

    Intricate Native jewelry from many cultures is sold at the market.

    After a modest start in 1993, Indian Market and Festival now is considered one of the top Native art markets in the nation. Artists are invited to participate through a juried selection and must be members of a federally or state recognized tribe. Judges award ribbons and cash prizes to winners in multiple divisions.

    Each of the past 25 years, a work of art shown at Indian Market was chosen as that year’s signature image, featured on commemorative Indian Market T-shirts. For the 26th market, the judging committee this year chose not one but three signature images: Purest of Love by Michelle Lowden (Acoma Pueblo), Tu’utuli by Gabriel Ayala (Pascua Yaqui) and Four Ravens by Gordon Coons (Ojibwa/Ottawa/Chippewa). Three T-shirt designs depicting the signature images will be available through the Museum Store.

    2017 Indian Market & Festival inside

    Market-goers can meet Native artists and purchase their beautiful art.

    Also new this year is the Market Morning Breakfast, held at 8 a.m. Saturday, June 23, for early birds who want to meet the artists in a more relaxed setting before big crowds arrive. Reservations are required for the Saturday breakfast; contact mwhistler@eiteljorg.com or 317.275.1316 for details.

    For the general public, Indian Market will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, June 23-24. Adult tickets are $15 at the gate. Advance tickets can be ordered online for $13 at www.eiteljorg.org or by calling 317.636.WEST (9378). Youth ages 17 and under are free at Indian Market. For Eiteljorg Museum members, free admission to the market is available for the individual named on the membership card, but the admission fee will apply for their non-member adult guests.

    Tickets to Indian Market includes museum admission, so plan to take advantage of the air-conditioning, Museum Café, beautiful galleries and special exhibitions The Reel West, Interwoven and Harry Fonseca: The Art of Living. Parking is available in the White River State Park underground garage while spaces last. Popular food vendors return, and artist demonstrations and art-making opportunities for the entire family will be available both days.

    Performers on the Indian Market Stage, June 23-24

    1. Gabriel Ayala - performerClassical guitarist Gabriel Ayala (Pascua Yaqui) performs classical music, jazz and flamenco and has released several albums. From Tucson, Arizona, Ayala has performed at the Kennedy Center and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian and won numerous music industry awards. Ayala also is a fine artist and will
    be showing his work at Indian Market. He performs at 11:45 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. both June 23 and 24.

    2. Kalyn Fay - performerSinger-songwriter Kalyn Fay (Cherokee) is part of the vibrant folk music scene in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and has made an impression with her first album, a mix of country, folk and rock original compositions about her life and journey. She performs at 10:15 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. both June 23 and 24.






    3. Dana Warrington - performer New PhotoTraditional dancer Dana Warrington (Prairie Band of Potawatomi/Menominee) also is an award-winning visual artist who creates quillwork and beadwork. His piece Family Traditions won the Best of Show award at last year’s Indian Market. A featured dance performer, Warrington has won several championships and creates his own dance regalia. He performs at 1:15 p.m. both June 23 and 24.   


    4. Tchin - performerStoryteller Tchin (Narragansett) is an award-winning metalsmith, flute-maker, educator, folklorist, musician and culture-bearer. Through the art of oral tradition, Tchin will share stories passed down through generations. He performs at 12:30 p.m. and 4:15 p.m. both June 23 and 24. 



    5. Buddy Big Mountain- performerEntertainer Buddy Big Mountain (Mohawk of Kahnawake Tribe of Canada) is a master puppeteer who blends his own grassroots style of comedy while sharing knowledge of his American Indian heritage. He performs at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. both June 23 and 24.





    To see the Indian Market and Festival entertainment performance schedule, click here


    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • Experience Miami culture, Sandhill Cranes on Eiteljorg tour Nov. 3

    by | | Jun 06, 2018

    Sandhill Cranes
    Sandhill Cranes at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area

    Join the Eiteljorg Museum staff on Nov. 3 for an all-day coach trip to northern Indiana focusing on the Miami Tribe and the fall migration of the Sandhill Crane. This is an ideal tour for those interested in Native American and Indiana history and for nature lovers.

    Learn about the Miami during stops at cultural sites important to the tribe’s history, including Seven Pillars near Peru, Indiana. We will arrive at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area during a peak time to witness thousands of Sandhill Cranes stopping to rest during their migration.

    Seven Pillars
    Seven Pillars near Peru, Ind.

    Spaces on the 32-seat motor coach are going fast. Eiteljorg members are $150 per person; non-members are $175. Cost includes travel by coach, lunch and dinner. For more information or to register, contact Martha Hill at mhill@eiteljorg.com or 317.275.1377.

    Sandhill Cranes at Sunset
    Sandhill Cranes at sunset


    Images by John Vanausdall



    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • The Reel West: Blockbuster exhibit on Hollywood Westerns keeps rolling at the Eiteljorg Museum

    by | | Jun 05, 2018

    The Reel West_032

    From the classic era to modern day, the Eiteljorg’s 2018 featured exhibit The Reel West explores the fascinating influence our favorite Western movies and TV shows have had on shaping American identity and influencing American culture. Featuring costumes, props, interactives and more, some of Hollywood’s biggest celebrities and popular Westerns are represented in The Reel West.

    Fans have the chance to see Danny Glover’s boots from Silverado, hats worn by Clint Eastwood in Rawhide and Pale Rider, a mask, shirt, hat, scarf and gun belt worn by The Lone Ranger (actor Clayton Moore), a hat worn by Jamie Foxx in Django Unchained, items from several John Wayne films, costumes worn by Catherine Zeta-Jones and Antonio Banderas in the Zorro movies and so much more. The Reel West is a true delight for movie fans of all ages.

    As The Reel West continues, so does an exciting array of programs that provide ample opportunities to return to the museum:

    • Saturday, July 7, 1 p.m. — Join Bruce Morgan, former Hollywood stunt performer, for an action-packed presentation as he unveils the secrets behind iconic Western stunts.

    • Saturday, Aug. 11, 1 p.m. — Author and historian Chris Enns focuses on the lives of some of Republic Studios’ most notable actresses from B-movie Westerns and the roles they played on and off screen.

    • Friday, Aug. 24, 5–8 p.m. — Wild Western Trivia Night: Don’t miss your chance to show off your knowledge of Hollywood Westerns during this entertaining trivia competition. For registration, contact sschmidt@eiteljorg.com or 317.275.1348.

    Eiteljorg Film Series

    Western films shown at the Eiteljorg are included with museum admission, and members are free.

    • July 7, 11 a.m. — The Searchers (1956) starring John Wayne

    • Aug. 4, 11 a.m. — Tombstone (1993)

    • Aug. 11, 11 a.m. — The Cowboy and the Senorita (1944)

    • Sept. 22, 11 a.m. — The Magnificent Seven (1960)

    • Sept. 28 — City Slickers (1991) Outdoor evening film showing, with chuck wagon grub.

    Westerns at the IMAX at the Indiana State Museum

    The IMAX Theater next door to the Eiteljorg will give Western film fans the chance to see classics on the largest screen in the state.

    • June 12, 7 p.m. — No Country for Old Men (2007)

    Tickets at www.tickmarq.com/sites/indyimax/films/ST00000234

    Check www.eiteljorg.org/thereelwest for additional film screening dates.

    The Reel West_001


    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • Exhibit looks at how Hollywood Westerns shape perceptions of American identity

    by | | Feb 15, 2018

    The Reel West headline

    Worldwide, people often formed their first impressions of the West and of America not from visiting its vast landscapes but from seeing tales of the West flicker onscreen.

    A romanticized and fictional version of the West galloped across movie screens and on televisions, thrilling audiences while portraying a violent and often simplistic version of American life in the frontier era, with spurs jingling and showdowns at high noon. After a century of Hollywood Western films and decades of Western TV shows, the storylines have become more complex and nuanced. And while fans now are as likely to watch by streaming video, the power of Westerns to create perceptions of the American West is undiminished.

    To explore the role of Hollywood in shaping American ideas of morality, diversity and national identity, the Eiteljorg Museum will take a deep dive into the Western genre through its next featured exhibit: The Reel West. Opening March 3, The Reel West explores the historic, artistic and cultural significance of Western films and TV shows. Film costumes, props, paintings, movie posters and images from the early silent Westerns and mid-20th century classics up through today all are represented.

    Included in the interesting things you will see in The Reel West are:

    • A mask, hat, costume, gun belt and scarf worn by The Lone Ranger, actor Clayton Moore

    • A full costume worn by Hailee Steinfeld as Mattie Ross in the Coen Brothers’ 2010 remake of True Grit

    • Two hats worn by Clint Eastwood, on his early 1960s TV show Rawhide and years later in his 1985 film Pale Rider

    • Western hats or other costume items worn on camera by Western performers from several eras, including John Wayne, Tom Mix, Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, James Arness, the cast members of Bonanza, plus Sam Elliott, Anjelica Huston, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Jamie Foxx and many others

    • Interactive technology including touchscreens that museum-goers can use to watch clips from Westerns and to explore in greater detail the themes of morality, diversity and identity that Westerns portray

    • A small movie theater showing clips from film trailers of well-known Western movies

    • Hands-on interactives for all ages.

    Among the Western films highlighted in The Reel West is director John Ford’s 1956 epic The Searchers, starring John Wayne and Natalie Wood. Though films of that so-called “classic” era certainly could be entertaining with good-versus-evil storylines, they often overlooked and distorted the roles of women, Native Americans, African Americans, Latino and LGBTQ communities in the actual West. As audiences and cultural sensibilities changed, Hollywood Westerns evolved over time; so the exhibit also looks at important historical and recent Western films that better convey the West’s diversity, some more realistically, some satirically or ironically, some combining elements of other film genres, such as science fiction.

    Cast, The Searchers, Lilly, Full Permissions

    “We are thrilled to present The Reel West, as this yearlong exhibit has multigenerational appeal to casual movie fans, serious film buffs, Baby Boomers who remember iconic Westerns and younger people new to the genre,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “Many special programming events are scheduled during the run of the exhibit where guests can learn more about how these films were made, thus enhancing their appreciation, understanding and enjoyment of Westerns.”

    Developed by Johanna M. Blume, the Eiteljorg’s associate curator of Western art, history and culture, The Reel West has been several years in the making. The exhibit includes art works from the museum’s collections, but Eiteljorg staff also traveled the nation to confer with other museums, collectors and studio archives that loaned costumes, objects and props for the exhibit.

    The Reel West, presented by Oxford Financial Group, LTD and sponsored by Ice Miller LLP, The Sunrise Foundation, Barnes & Thornburg LLP, the Indiana-polis Colts, Nordstrom, Frank N. and Patricia L. Owings and other sponsors, continues through Feb. 3, 2019 in the special exhibit gallery, and is included with regular museum admission.

    Original Westworld, Alamy, Promotion non-paid use, Exhibit Permissions


    A year of fascinating, fun programming for The Reel West

    The Reel West will kick off with a special opening reception Friday evening March 2. For information and reservations, contact Mary Whistler at 317.275.1316 or mwhistler@eiteljorg.com.

    Eiteljorg partner IMAX Theater will hold screenings of Western films throughout the exhibition. Tickets to an IMAX Western include Eiteljorg Museum admission. Check www.eiteljorg.org for details of film screenings.

    Here are other programming events in connection with The Reel West, all at the Eiteljorg unless otherwise noted:

    • Curator’s Choice talk, Women in Westerns: A sneak peek at The Reel West exhibition with Johanna M. Blume, noon March 2

    • Presentation by award-winning Dances with Wolves costume designer Cathy Smith, 1 p.m. March 3

    • Screenings of the silent films An Eastern Westerner and Safety Last! accompanied by the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra, March 10 and March 11, at the Schrott Center for the Arts. Tickets available on the ICO website, www.icomusic.org

    • Lecture and gallery tour with Dr. Sue Matheson, Western film scholar, focused on art works that influenced John Ford films, 1 p.m. March 31

    • Presentation by Emmy Award-winning writer and co-producer of Into the West, Kirk Ellis, 1 p.m. April 7

    • Trivia night, chuckwagon grub, movie screenings and much more.

    More events are being added all the time; please visit www.eiteljorg.org for the latest details.

    Image Captions:

    Promotional artwork of Yul Brynner in Westworld, 1973
    Photo 12 / Alamy Stock Photo

    Cast in The Searchers, 1956
    Image courtesy Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

     

    This article originally appeared in the February 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 

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