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  • Celebrate Native American Heritage Month at the Eiteljorg

    by Alisa Nordholt-Dean | Oct 23, 2017

    Mario Martinez_Conversation

    November is National Native American Heritage Month and what better way to celebrate than by visiting the Eiteljorg. Peruse the museum galleries, join in a curator tour, see Native Art Now! and meet two incredibly talented Native artists visiting Indianapolis to inspire visitors and showcase their beadwork skills. Here is a sampling of what’s in store for November.

    Curator’s Choice Tour:
    Cut Fold, and Sew: The Miami, Potawatomi and Delaware Arts of Ribbonwork with Dr. Scott Shoemaker, the Thomas G. and Susan C. Hoback curator of Native American art, history and culture. Nov. 3 at noon.

    Native Art Now! 
    Don’t miss this exhibit of iconic contemporary Native art from the Eiteljorg’s permanent collection. Opens Nov. 11.

    Karen Ann HoffmanArtist in Residence: Karen Ann Hoffman (Oneida)
    Award-winning artist Karen Ann Hoffman creates beautifully decorative pieces using Iroquois raised beadwork. Her work has been displayed across the nation and is in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, the Wisconsin Historical Museum and other institutions. Meet Karen and learn about her art and culture during open studio sessions on Nov. 11, 18 and 25. She will also teach a brooch-making workshop on Nov. 22.


    Katrina MittenArtist in Residence: Katrina Mitten (Miami Tribe of Oklahoma)
    Beadwork artist Katrina Mitten creates embroidery-style beadwork traditional to Native peoples of the Great Lakes. She has won numerous awards for her work over the years and her pieces can be seen in museums around the nation. On Nov. 24 and 25, meet Katrina, learn about her Miami culture, and watch as she demonstrates beadwork techniques.

    Visit www.eiteljorg.org/explore/calendar for the latest information about art-making events and opportunities to meet artists.

     

    Image caption for Native Art Now! image at top:

    Mario Martinez (Pascua Yaqui, born 1953)
    The Conversation, 2004
    Acrylic and charcoal on canvas
    Museum Purchase: Eiteljorg Fellowship

     

    This article originally appeared in the November 2017 issue of Storyteller magazine.

     





  • Day of the Dead celebration brings community together

    by Eiteljorg Staff | Sep 25, 2017
    Day of the Dead 2What comes to mind when you conjure up images of Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead)?  A somber memorial? Gruesome Halloween ghouls? Well, picture vibrant swirling color, lively music, dancing calavaras (skeletons), rhythmic sounds of hammers making punched-tin treasures, laughter as children enjoy delightful papel picado (cut paper) creations, beautiful Catrinas dressed for a parade and elaborate ofrendas (altars) created to honor deceased loved ones. It’s all part of Nopal Cultural’s annual Día de los Muertos Celebration at the Eiteljorg Museum.


    What is
    Día de los Muertos?

    With roots going back thousands of years to indigenous traditions in Mexico, this holiday is a time to gather together to remember and celebrate friends and relatives who have passed on. Day of the Dead has evolved into a diverse festival, celebrated not only in Mexico but in the U.S. and many other countries.

    During this two-day holiday for honoring the dead, tradition holds that souls are allowed to return home and celebrate among the living, if only for a few short hours. Meanwhile, living relatives work hard to clean and decorate gravesites with fragrant, colorful cempasuchil (marigold) flowers and construct elaborate altars with photographs, food and drink. Some communities even hold town-wide festivals culminating in parades and special dances.

    Join us in celebration

    Day of the Dead 1Join Nopal Cultural and the Eiteljorg in celebration on Saturday, Oct. 28. Because this is a special holiday, museum admission will be free to everyone on that date. Festivities include dance performances, art-making, a mercado (marketplace), music, ofrendas, a Catrina parade, artist-in-residence Richard Gabriel, Jr., who specializes in Spanish Colonial tinwork and so much more. The event is sponsored by the Lopez Law Firm and The Penrod Society.

    DAY OF THE DEAD CELEBRATION
    OCT 28
    Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
    FREE Admission

    Day of the Dead image- ofrendaA special exhibit of ofrendas (altars) will be on exhibit in the Lilly Theater from Oct. 10 – Nov. 2 and seeing it is included with the regular museum admission  cost -- with the exception of Oct. 28, when admission to the Eiteljorg Museum is free.























  • Jammin’ In July | Live Music Every Wednesday

    by Sandy Schmidt, Eiteljorg public programs coordinator | Jul 07, 2015
    Music. It comes in all verities. It can be loud or quiet. It can be calming or inspiring. It can create emotions and recall memories.  Some types you love and others, well….they maybe aren’t your jam.  Everyone has a favorite song, whether it is classical, hard rock, pop, country or anything in between.  You know the feeling when that song comes on… suddenly it is the only thing you want to focus on for the next three minutes and you will not hesitate to silence your friend mid story by turning the volume to a level your Mother would condemn.  Don’t lie, you like music and you probably have done that at least once in your life.  That is one of the biggest reasons we have chosen to have live music under our new addition, The Sails!  This is going to be a wonderful community spot! We will have shade, games, drinks and tunes outside the museum, right next to the Canal.  As we completely understand that people have a variety of tastes in music, we are featuring a variety of bands each Wednesday evening in July from 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. beginning on July 1st.

    We have booked some pretty great local bands including Freddie T & The People, Soundz of Santana, and Coolidge.  We also have The Indianapolis Ceili Band for a performance before they make their way to Ireland to compete!  All in all, we have a lot planned out there for that community space this summer and we would love to see your face!

    Just a head’s up, bringing your lunch to enjoy out under The Sails is wonderful…I may even venture to say blissful. Then factor in a little bit of lunch time live music that will be happening occasionally, and you will have an awesome work day break!  Wednesdays are about to get a whole lot better.

    Jammin' Line up:
     
    Soundz of Santana6
    July 8
    Soundz of Santana

    Whiloughby Sprig1
    (Willoughby Sprig)


    July 15
    Willoughby Sprig,  
    Indiana Old Time Ambassadors 
    Indianapolis Ceili Band 2014
    July 22
    Indianapolis Ceili Band
    Emily Ann Thompson Band

    July 29
    Frank Dean, Scott Parkhurst and LuAnn Lancton
    Coolidge
    Go comment!




  • Forging Community | What life was like in Gold Rush towns

    by Johanna M. Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator | May 29, 2015

    This is the only hotel in this vicinity, and as there is a really excellent bowling alley attached to it, and the barroom has a floor upon which the miners can dance, and, above all, a cook who can play the violin, it is very popular.
    —Louise Clappe, Indian Bar, California, October 7, 1851

    In California the richest diggings were isolated in the northern ranges of the Sierra Nevada. The gold camps were often temporary, as most gold seekers did not intend to stay in California after making their fortunes, and this in turn contributed to a rougher character overall. However, these communities were not without their luxuries. Most gold camps contained a sampling of shops and businesses, roadhouses, and drinking and gambling establishments. The camp at Rich Bar even had a bowling alley!

    San Francisco served as a hub of social and business activity for the thousands of people coming in to and going out of California during the gold rush. Many who made their fortunes, whether through mining for gold or “mining the miners,” settled in the city and became part of the city’s elite class.

     eliza jane steen johnson-for blog
     Untitled (Eliza Jane Steen-Johnson), ca. 1852
    Image courtesy of the Collection of the Oakland Museum of California. Gift of Barbara Smith; H96.44.1

    Eliza Steen-Johnson and her husband settled in San Francisco after emigrating from Ireland in 1850. They owned and operated a dry goods store and hat shop in the city.

    On Saturday May 30 at 2 p.m., join Gold! curator, Johanna Blume, for a gallery talk that explores what life was like in gold rush communities, with a special focus on the stories of women in the California, Black Hills, and Yukon-Klondike gold rushes.

    2 Comments




  • All that Glitters | New exhibit tells true stories behind America's Gold Rushes

    by DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg public relations manager | Feb 02, 2015
    Eiteljorg gold hair comb cup ring nuggets
    Gold hair comb, cup, ring, and nuggets

    Loan: Courtesy of Greg and Petra Martin
    Photography by Hadley Fruits

    What could tempt a doctor and his wife to leave their children and risk their lives? Persuade financiers to gamble on risky exploits?  Redraw the face of the American landscape? The insatiable pursuit for unimaginable wealth… the lure of quick money… gold. On Mar. 7, the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art will open Gold! Riches and Ruin, a new exhibit that explores a valuable mineral – and all the glitter and greed attached to the desire to get it. 

    “Our guests will see gold in all its forms – gold bars, gold jewelry and gold nuggets,” says John Vanausdall, Eiteljorg president and CEO. “But they will also witness some of the most compelling stories ever told related to the hunt for gold.”

    Gold! Riches and Ruin will demonstrate how the hunt for gold in the West changed the demography of an entire region, and had a profound impact on Native American populations. Gold rushes lured men and women from all walks of life, from all around the world, to places like California, the Black Hills of South Dakota, the Canadian Yukon and Alaska in pursuit of wealth and adventure. 
    Eiteljorg gold spanish flat
    Spanish Flat, ca. 1852
    Photographer: Joseph B. Starkweather
    Image courtesy of the California State Library, California History Room

    Johanna gold curator
    According to Johanna Blume (pictured left), exhibit curator, visitors to the museum will get to “meet” a host of  fortune seekers. Blume says stories in the exhibit illustrate the “perseverance and adventure” involved in striking it rich, but also the “ravenousness, violence, sacrifice and failure.”

    “The show celebrates the stories of those who struck it rich, but recognizes the unlucky ones who lost everything in their quest for riches.”

    Captivating accounts from gold rush experiences, spanning the 1840s to the 1910s, told through art and artifacts will come alive through comprehensive programs, interactive media and hands-on S.T.E.M. (Science Technology Engineering and Math) activities. The exhibit will also explore the broader appeal of gold up to the present day. Guests will see and experience:

    - Gold nuggets, coins, bars, jewelry and more
    - Gold mining equipment and tools
    - Paintings, journals and diaries, clothing and personal effects that belonged to prospective gold miners
    - Bars of gold salvaged from the shipwreck of the SS Central America, a steamship that sank off the Carolina coast in 1857 loaded with thousands of pounds of gold from the California gold fields
    - Science-focused activities which will lead students to think about how gold is sought, the technology used to extract it and the impact mining has on the environment.
    - An outdoor gold panning experience which will allow visitors to pan for “gold” and then use that gold to “purchase” an item in the Frank and Katrina Basile Museum Store.

    Gold! Riches and Ruin will be celebrated with an opening night party and exhibit preview, at 6 p.m., Friday, Mar. 6. Tickets range from $40 - $55. At the event guests will actually be able to search the museum for “gold.” The guest who finds the most will win gold jewelry! Gold! closes Aug. 9.
     
    Presenting sponsors of Gold! are Wells Fargo and Eli Lilly and Company Foundation with sponsorship support from Capital Group Companies and Barnes & Thornburg LLP.

     
     Gold sponsors
     
     

    Go comment!
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