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  • New Art 2.0 | Introducing Corwin “Corky” Clairmont

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art, and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 09, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.

    Banana Polar Bear
    Banana Polar Bear, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22 ⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    Our Indian communities have thousands of years of history that need to be recognized and celebrated. We have many stories yet to tell from the past and the present as we are still here. - Corwin "Corky" Clairmong (Salish Kootenai)

    Corwin "Corky" Clairmont was born at the St. Ignatius Mission on the Flathead Reservation in Montana. In 1984, after living in Los Angeles for 14 years, Clairmont returned to the Flathead Reservation, where he lives and works today. Clairmont is part of an important group of Native American artists who use their cultural experiences and background in combination with techniques such as printmaking and photography to bring attention to the traditions and challenges that are part of the lives of Native people and their communities. Clairmont is a 2003 Eiteljorg Fellow and has exhibited his work across the U.S. His work is included in many public and private collections, including the Eiteljorg Museum’s permanent collection.

    Waiting for the ice
    Waiting for the Ice, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    More about Corky
    Corky is a celebrated contemporary artist, combining his experience as a native person and tribal member with a post-modernist view of the realities of life as indigenous people struggle to retain their identities and sovereignty into the 21st century. He is also a teacher, mentor and a community activist, and lives in Ronan. A member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Corky has been the art director at Salish Kootenai College since 1984. Previously, he was an instructor and printmaking department head at Otis/Parsons Art Institute in LA.

    Corky holds a BA from MSU, did a graduate fellowship at San Fernando State University and received an MFA from California State University at Los Angeles. His work has been exhibited from coast to coast and around the world, including Germany and New Zealand, and has been reviewed by the New York Times. He also designed the cover and emblem for the American Indian Library Association and a large granite warrior memorial for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation in 2007.

    Through the years, he has served on many professional boards, curated and juried many art shows, and he has received a Ford Foundation grant and NEA and MAC grants. Corky was also awarded the 2008 Montana Governor’s Arts Award for Visual Art. (Source: www.Montana.gov)
     
    New art sponsors

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  • Inside the Eiteljorg's Arctic Gallery

    by Johanna Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator of western art | Nov 26, 2014

    artic-dogsledding blog
    Sleds have long been used for transportation of goods and people in the Arctic. Before contact with European and American explorers, Alaska Natives, pulled sleds with small teams of dogs harnessed alongside the sled, or with human labor. After contact, larger teams of dogs were harnessed to the front of the sled. Since many communities in Southwestern Alaska aren’t connected by roads, sleds are still a crucial mode of transportation in the fall and winter. Today many people use snowmobiles to pull their sleds, although dog teams are still a common sight. Dogsleds are also part of recreational life in the Arctic. Since 1973 dogsled teams from around the world have competed in the Iditarod, an annual dogsled race that runs from Willow, Alaska to Nome, Alaska.

    There are many objects in the Eiteljorg’s collection related to dogsleds, some of which are on display. In our Arctic gallery you can see a Yup’ik made dogsled, and an Inupiat carved walrus tusk that depicts a dogsled team and driver as well as a variety of animals the Inupiat traditionally hunt.

    artic - archives univ of alaska
    Bethel, 1939-1959
    Image Courtesy: Averill and June Thayer Photographs; Alaska and Polar Regions Collections, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
    artic - leaving dawson
    Dogsled team preparing to leave Dawson for Nome, Alaska, Feb. 11, 1900
    Image Courtesy: University of Washington Libraries Special Collections, William E. Meed Photograph Collection, PH Coll 246

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  • Olympian Billy Mills To Share His Life Story at the Eiteljorg, 1 p.m., Sat. Nov. 8

    by Martha Hill, PhD | Nov 03, 2014

     
    Billy Mills’ (Oglala Lakota) life has been on an incredible journey: one that started on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota in 1938. That journey has taken him from the reservation to the medal platform at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics and beyond.

    On Saturday, Nov.  8, 2014, at 1 p.m., the Eiteljorg Museum will proudly present Running Bravely Through Life - a screening of the film, Running Brave and an inspirational session with Billy Mills. The film chronicles Mills’ early life and journey to the Olympic Games. Following the film, Billy and his wife Pat discuss what it takes to discover your passion and fulfill your dreams. Mills will also sign his book, Wokini: A Lakota Journey to Happiness and Self-Understanding, following the program.

    Running Bravely Through Life will afford community members the opportunity to hear from a man who had a dream and a goal and focused his young life toward achieving that goal. At the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo, Mills took gold in the 10,000 meter race. Considered one of the greatest upsets in Olympic history, Mills outran several international track greats to become the first and, to date, only American to win gold in the 10,000 meter event, while also setting an Olympic record.

    Mills’ early journey is the subject of the 1983 film Running Brave. The audience will be introduced to the young man who was orphaned by the time he was 12 and sent off to boarding school. It wasn’t until high school in Lawrence, Kansas that he discovered he had a passion for running. He earned a full athletic scholarship to the University of Kansas. But Mills’ life was difficult. He even considered suicide and related, “he felt broken by the racism around [him and looked] toward Native American virtues and values to overcome that.”
    “Though, his

    Running Brave is the story of a journey to the Olympics. However his journey did not end with winning gold. That was just the first step. Today he works closely with American Indian youth across the country through his foundation, Running Strong for American Indian Youth. He is an inspirational speaker with the message of looking inside yourself, discovering your passion, working hard and achieving success and happiness. This is the message and the challenge that he will give to the community in Running Bravely Through Life.

    Billy Mills with gold medalRunning Bravely Through Life
    Saturday, Nov. 8, 2014
    1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

    *This event is part of the 2014 Spirit & Place Festival, which runs from Nov. 7-16, 2014.

    Thank you to our sponsors: Citizens Energy Group, IUPUI, NCAA and Purdue University
     

     

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  • New Art 2.0 | Exhibit and sale opens Saturday, Nov. 1

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt and Ashley Holland | Oct 29, 2014
    Bird Hat 

    Rick Bartow (Wiyot of Northern California), Bird Hat, 2013, monoprint, edition 1/1, 30 1/8 x 22 1/2 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    Collector. Patron. Donor. These are a few of the words museum insiders like to use. They sound impressive. How can someone become associated with one or all of these words? How do they become more than words that give meaning to people’s lives, both personally and for the public? It is art, but is it good? Who makes those determinations? How? It was these questions and ideas that led to the creation of New Art 2.0.

    Feddersen and Lavadour
    Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes) and James Lavadour (Walla Walla), Untitled (Amongst Friends series), 2010, monotype, edition 1/1, 15 x 22 3/8 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    The New Art of the West series is not a new concept. It is the exhibition that helped to establish the Eiteljorg contemporary collection and in particular planted the seed of interest in Native American contemporary work that has become the hallmark of the contemporary collection. The series promoted cultural variety and diverse traditions as well as time-honored practices in landscape, portraiture, and still life. New Art 2.0 takes its cue from the exhibition that produced nine shows and catalogues and highlighted the best emerging and established contemporary artists working in the West today.

    Eva Lake, Golden
    Eva Lake (American, born 1956), Golden no. 2, 2012, lithograph, edition 14/14, 30 x 30 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.
     
    We are grateful to the patrons and collectors who supported our initial efforts at collecting during the museum’s 25 years. As the museum looks to the next 25, it also ushers in a new generation of patrons and collectors with New Art 2.0. This next exhibition is a fitting complement to the collecting opportunities found in Quest for the West and our annual Indian Market and Festival.

    Working in partnership with Crow’s Shadow Institute of Art , with a little help from Todd Bockley Gallery in Minneapolis, Minnesota, New Art 2.0 includes prints by Native and non-Native contemporary artists and features many artists whose work is already in the Eiteljorg permanent contemporary collection. Native artists Joe Feddersen, Marie Watt, Jim Denomie, Truman Lowe, and Kay WalkingStick, to name a few, are coupled with non-Native artists such as Dale Chihuly and Storm Tharp.

    Damien Gilley, Everything Incorporated
    Damien Gilley, Everything Incorporated, 2014, lithograph, edition 1/12, 22 x 30 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    So to answer a few questions new patrons and collectors may have, owning artwork creates an affinity and affiliation with artists and organizations, and a curiosity and empathy for broadening world views. Patronage at any level indicates a responsibility and embodies idealism toward humanity and the musing of mere mortals.

    Can one piece of art really incite so much? We have seen it happen again and again. Let it happen to you.

     New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000. 
     
     

     

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  • Navajo Rugs, Buckaroo Bash and a Halloween Event Just for Adults | October Calendar of Events

    by Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art | Oct 02, 2014

     October gives visitors plenty of chances to learn, play and party at the Eiteljorg!
      

     
    Dawn Dark Mountain (Oneida of Wisconsin), Beneath the Ever Growing Tree 

    Saturday
    Oct. 4
    1 p.m. – 4 p.m.

    Meet Artist-in-Residence Dawn Dark Mountain (Oneida of Wisconsin)
    Dawn specializes in transparent watercolors. In addition to her paintings, she creates linoleum and wood-block prints that are then completed with watercolor. Visitors can learn about Dawn’s culture and watch as she demonstrates her techniques.
     

    Navajo Rug Auction at the Eiteljorg Museum

    Saturday
    Oct 4
    Navajo Rug Auction

    9:30-11:00 a.m.    Preview 
    11:30 a.m.            Auction Begins
    Navajo rugs in traditional and contemporary designs from the R.B. Burnham & Co. Trading Post in Arizona will be auctioned. Prices range from less than $100 to $10,000. 
      
    Presse_When_Thou_Art_Gone
    Quest artist Heide Presse, When Thou Art Gone to Western Land, 2014, Oil on Linen, 26 x 26 inches
    Sunday
    Oct. 5
    Quest for the West® Art Show and Sale closes at 5 p.m.  


    DG House (Cherokee of NE Alabama), Ancestors Yet to Come
     
    Saturdays
    Oct 11, 18 and 25

    1 p.m. – 4 p.m. 

    Meet Artist-in-Residence DG House (Cherokee of NE Alabama)
    Contemporary Native American artist, DG House, will share her art and culture. Guests may also watch her demonstrate her mixed media and painting techniques.
     
    Saturday
    Oct. 18
    10 a.m. – Noon
    Ledger Art Workshop
    Join artist-in-residence, DG House, for this one-of-a-kind workshop and learn about the history of ledger art explained through the story of the Battle of Little Bighorn. With DG’s guidance, participants will create their own personal ledger art to take home. Materials Fee: Non-Members $12. To pre-register by Oct.11, call 317.275.1370.



    Saturday
    Oct. 18
    7 p.m.
    Leather and Lace |The 17th Annual
    Buckaroo Bash
    The Buckaroo Bash is one of the Eiteljorg’s biggest fundraisers. Proceeds from the event purchase art supplies for visiting students and support education programs such as artists in residence, gallery interpreters, and Eiteljorg Museum to the Classrooms: Stories of Diversity. RSVP by Oct. 10. by calling 317.275.1333. Price: $200


    Day of the Dead/ Dia de los Muertos at the Eiteljorg Museum

    Saturday
    Oct. 25

    11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    Day of the Dead/Dia de los Muertos (photo attached)
    This year NOPAL (an Indianapolis Latino arts and culture organization), is partnering with the Eiteljorg to provide an upbeat experience during the Day of the Dead celebration. The event will include festive and thoughtful ofrendas (altars that honor deceased loved ones); art created by local artists; a mercado; and a Katrina fashion show. Entertainment will be provided by NOPAL Musicians and Anderson Ballet Folklorico. Guests may visit with New Mexican tin artist Richard Gabriel, Jr., and local contemporary papel picado artist Beatriz Schlebecker. Guests will get to create their own papel picado and tin ornament to take home.

    Friday
    Oct. 31
    8 p.m. – Midnight

    Freiteljorg with the ICO and DJ Kyle Long (an adult Halloween party)
    Celebrate the opening of New Art 2.0 by partying until the witching hour in your most haunting attire. Enjoy grown-up trick-or-treating, while grooving to an unforgettable live mash-up of modern DJ experimental sounds featuring DJ Kyle Long and the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra. Costumes mimicking Native Americans or people of other races will not be tolerated. Price: $20 for non Agave members, $30 at the door.
     
     
     Rick Bartow (Wiyot tribe of Northern California), Bird Hat, 2013, monoprint, edition 1/1, 30 1/8 x 22 1/2, Print courtesy: Crow's Shadow Press, Photography by Hadley Fruits. 

    Saturday
    Nov 1

    New Art 2.0 opens
    Dates: Nov. 1 –Jan. 4, 2015

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints by contemporary Native and Western artists, many of them Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellows. It is a blend of landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Eighty limited-edition prints will be on exhibit. Prices range from $500 - $4,000. 

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