Menu
Blog
Eiteljorg Musuem Blog
  • Perspective: Every Second Monday in October and Why Not Indigenous Peoples Day?

    by Dorene Red Cloud, assistant curator of Native American art | Oct 09, 2017

    This week of October 9, 2017, will consist of many reminders about one of my least favorite historical figures, Christopher Columbus. For instance, today is Columbus Day observed. Then this Thursday October 12, 2017, it will be the actual 525th anniversary of Columbus arriving, lost, on the shores of the Bahamas. And I have already seen countless advertisements of Columbus Day sales for mattresses, department stores, and what have you, and I can tell you, I am not inspired to shop. And I like to shop!

    Every Columbus Day, observed and actual, I wear all black clothing for it is a day of mourning, in my opinion. Backed by Spain (although he was Italian), Columbus (born Cristoforo Colombo) was in search of a trade route to the Far East. When he arrived in the Caribbean, he believed he had “discovered” India, so he monikered the people (who had welcomed this stranger politely), “Indians.” Because these people were not Christianized, Columbus, during each trip to what is now called Central and South America, claimed the land and resources for Spain. 

    Speaking of resources, Columbus wanted the gold that he saw the people wearing so he began to demand it — and over a short period of time — more and more of it. He invented methods to punish the people who did not procure enough gold in ways I do not care to elaborate. But I can tell you this much, I never wear gold in memoriam of all of the Indigenous people who were tortured and killed for this gold lust.

    Until that time, gold had mainly been collected from the Ivory Coast of Africa. Due to Columbus’ new system of supply and demand, the “idea” of trading slaves from Africa to replace the decreasing gold supply (and thereby create a new market), occurred. Thus, the introduction of transatlantic slavery was born.

    Did you know that Columbus never landed on North American soil and that Columbus Day was not an official federal government holiday until 1937?  So why do we continue to honor Columbus whose influence introduced disease, rape, and massacre, or, the colonization of the Americas? 

    I want to pay homage to the cities in the U.S. whose citizens voted that they would rather observe a celebration honoring Indigenous Peoples Day and not Christopher Columbus. Seattle, Washington; Portland, Oregon; Berkeley, California, Phoenix, Arizona; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Asheville, North Carolina; and Ann Arbor, Michigan, are some of the cities that no longer observe Columbus Day. And, who, in my humble opinion, totally rock for taking a stand to say “no, we will no longer celebrate a harbinger of death and colonial figure!”

    For many reasons, it behooves us to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples Day.  Despite the millions of Indigenous peoples who perished as a result of contact with Europeans who travelled to all of the Americas after 1492, we Indigenous peoples are still here.  In the U.S., we are 4 million-strong and growing. There are still several millions of Indigenous peoples in Central and South America too, despite history recording these peoples as Latin Americans. Most of you know and are friends with Indigenous peoples, and we have a lot to offer to not only this country, but to the entire world.

    So the true celebration is in our resiliency and survival, our strength and perseverance, and our sense of humor and personalities.  There are so many, many reasons to retire Columbus, ceremonially and officially. So please join me in greeting one another today (and on Thursday, Oct. 12) with “Happy Indigenous Peoples Day!”

    Dorene Red Cloud (Oglala Lakota) wrote this opinion piece for the Eiteljorg blog.





  • Indian Market and Festival 2015 |Traditional Hopi Piki Bread

    by Debi Lander | Jun 25, 2015
    As Indian Market and Festival draws near, we’d like to tell you about some of the things we’re extra excited about.

     
    Number 1: The 1491s
    Number 2: Twin Rivers 
    Number 3: Down Feathers and Masks! 
    Number 4: Stories!
    Number 5: Buck! 
    and...
    Number 6: Traditional Hopi Piki Bread!

    We are thrilled that Iva Honyestewa (Hopi) will be doing Piki Bread making demonstrations throughout the weekend of Indian Market and Festival, June 27-28. You can also catch Navajo Frybread and Miami Acorn Flatbread demos. piki 1 
    What do you need to know about Piki Bread?

    By Debi Lander of http://bylanderseafood.blogspot.com/

    Piki bread is a traditional staple of the Hopi people and the ancient New Mexico Pueblo peoples. The dry, thin rolled bread truly melts in your mouth and tastes delicious. The technique used to make the featherweight thin bread is difficult to master and has been passed down from mothers to daughters for generations. I had the privilege of watching Iva Honyestewa make the authentic recipe in her own piki house on the Hopi lands in Arizona.

    Piki takes several days to make from scratch but Iva started her preparations beforehand by grinding blue cornmeal down to a fine powder and obtaining culinary ash from burnt juniper trees. 

    piki 2
    She began by lighting a fire of cedar wood below her stone cook top.  
    piki 4
    Then, she mixed the grayish blue cornmeal with hot water and added the ash through a fine sieve. The mush looked like sticky play dough, but she continued adding more water to make it thinner. 

     piki 6

    Iva eventually used her hand to finish mixing. 

    piki 7
    Next, she brushed her stone with oil (traditionally oily sheep brains) and ran her hand on top to check the heat.

     

    piki 8

    The thin batter was then hand smeared over the stone into a translucent layer. Iva repeatedly dipped her fingers in the batter to cover any holes and smooth out the layer. The batter bakes instantly and in a very short time becomes dry enough to lift or peel off.  Iva then transferred the near weightless cooked sheet of bread to her table.

     piki 10

    When three or four wafer thin layers are baked and stacked, they are folded and wrapped together. If necessary, they are placed back on the stone for a few seconds to reheat before folding. 

     

    piki 11

    The finished roll is placed in the basket. The entire recipe requires about 3-4 hours work to complete.

    Be sure to stop by to visit Iva as she makes Piki Bread during Indian Market and Festival. For more information about what’s happening Indian Market weekend, and to purchase advance sale tickets, visit Indian Market & Festival info

    Special thanks to Debi Lander for permission to use this blog post.

    For the original post, visit the blog By ~ Lander ~ Sea Food Tales

    ------

    Before the kick-off of Indian Market, the Eiteljorg will host two parties Friday, June 26 – the official IMF Preview Party and the AfterGlow party featuring the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long.

    Preview Party Details
    5:30 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    Price: $90/members $100/non-members
    An exclusive first-look shopping opportunity and reception. Attendees get free weekend passes to Indian Market and Festival.

    IMF AfterGlow
    9 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    Price: Free for AGAVE members and $15/non-members and non-Indian Market and Festival Preview Party attendees
    Grab a glow stick and join us for beverages, dancing, desserts and entertainment by the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long. Interact with artists in a relaxed setting along the canal and underneath The Sails of the Eiteljorg. Call (317) 275-1333 to make reservations.

    Time, Tickets and Parking
    - Indian Market and Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in White River State Park’s Military Park, just north of the museum in downtown Indianapolis.

    - Discounted advanced tickets for the event are on sale at the Eiteljorg Museum, on the museum’s website and Marsh Supermarkets or by calling 1-800-622-2024.

    - Advance sale tickets are $10. Tickets during the market are $12 at the gate. Kids 17 and under are FREE. Admission to the Eiteljorg is included.

    - White River State Park underground garage next to the Eiteljorg Museum and IUPUI parking lots across from Military Park provides the most convenient and inexpensive parking for this event. Shuttles to and from the museum are available.

    -Parking in the White River State Park garage will not be validated Indian Market weekend.

    For even more information about what’s happening Indian Market weekend, and to purchase advance sale tickets, visit Indian Market & Festival info.

    Go comment!




  • Indian Market & Festival | Twin Rivers

    by Jaq Nigg, Eiteljorg festivals and events manager | Jun 16, 2015

    As Indian Market and Festival draws near, we’d like to tell you about some of the things we’re extra excited about.

    #1: The 1491s

     #2: Ready to dance!

    Twin Rivers is a four piece group infusing reggae, rock, jazz and traditional Native voices to create a positive sound for the contemporary ear.

    Indian Market - twin rivers

    Musicians Adrian Wall and Ed Kabotie have known each other since their early teens. Over the years, they have fostered a friendship that is embodied in the music of their band, Twin Rivers. The winsome blend of traditional and contemporary vocals combined with beautifully melodic songs create a refreshingly genuine expression by these Pueblo artists.

    Indian Market - adrian wall 
    The group has developed a conscious sense of environment that remains prominent in their music. Lead singer Ed Kabotie develops lyrics derived from his traditional Hopi and Tewa heritage. Jemez Pueblo flutist and guitarist Adrian Wall lays down the melody. Drummer Ehren Kee Natay (Navajo/Cherokee) and bassist, Rylan Kabotie (Jicarilla Apache) provide the drive and groove. The group collectively brings together multiple Native cultural identities to provide songs that accept the philosophy that we are all distinct, but connected as one.

    For more information about what’s happening Indian Market weekend, and to purchase advance sale tickets, visit Indian Market & Festival info

    -----

    Before the kick-off of Indian Market, the Eiteljorg will host two parties Friday, June 26 – the official IMF Preview Party and the AfterGlow party featuring the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long.

    Preview Party Details
    5:30 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    Price: $90/members $100/non-members
    An exclusive first-look shopping opportunity and reception. Attendees get free weekend passes to Indian Market and Festival.

    IMF AfterGlow
    9 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    Price: Free for AGAVE members and $15/non-members and non-Indian Market and Festival Preview Party attendees
    Grab a glow stick and join us for beverages, dancing, desserts and entertainment by the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long. Interact with artists in a relaxed setting along the canal and underneath The Sails of the Eiteljorg. Call (317) 275-1333 to make reservations.

    Time, Tickets and Parking
    - Indian Market and Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in White River State Park’s Military Park, just north of the museum in downtown Indianapolis.

    - Discounted advanced tickets for the event are on sale at the Eiteljorg Museum, on the museum’s website and Marsh Supermarkets or by calling 1-800-622-2024.

    - Advance sale tickets are $10. Tickets during the market are $12 at the gate. Kids 17 and under are FREE. Admission to the Eiteljorg is included.

    - White River State Park underground garage next to the Eiteljorg Museum and IUPUI parking lots across from Military Park provides the most convenient and inexpensive parking for this event. Shuttles to and from the museum are available.

    -Parking in the White River State Park garage will not be validated Indian Market weekend.

    For even more information about what’s happening Indian Market weekend, and to purchase advance sale tickets, visit Indian Market & Festival info.

    Go comment!




  • Indian Market & Festival | The 1491s

    by Jaq Nigg, Eiteljorg festivals and markets manager | Jun 16, 2015

    As Indian Market and Festival draws near, we’d like to tell you about some of the things we’re extra excited about.

    #1: The 1491s are coming! The 1491s are coming!

    Performing both Saturday and Sunday at 1:30pm at Indian Market and Festival as well as a sneak performance at the Friday night Preview Party, the comedy group The 1491s

     1491sgroupF

    Our official descriptions of The 1491s:

    Admired by fans for poking fun of stereotypes and offering unexpected insights into contemporary Native American life, the sketch comedy group 1491s has received national recognition for their mix of irreverent, ironic and highly infectious humor. Recently featured on a segment of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart that focused on issues surrounding the name of the Washington NFL team, the 1491s don’t shy away from uncomfortable subjects. Using performance art and social media, they have built a large following challenging perceptions and taking aim at the appropriation of Indigenous cultures.

    In their own words (from their website):

    The 1491s comedy group is based in the wooded ghettos of Minnesota and buffalo grass of Oklahoma. They are a gaggle of Indians chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of Indigenous satire. They coined the term “All My Relations,” and are still waiting for the royalties. They were at Custer’s Last Stand. They mooned Chris Columbus when he landed. They invented bubble gum.

     

    1491s - courtesy of 1491s 

    Basically, the 1491s are funny. But, don’t take our word for it. Check out some of their videos:

    Indian Store

    Honor Song

    I’m an Indian Too

    Represent – Jingle Dance

    Before the kick-off of Indian Market, the Eiteljorg will host two parties Friday, June 26 – the official IMF Preview Party and the AfterGlow party featuring the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long.

    Preview Party Details
    5:30 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    Price: $90/members $100/non-members
    An exclusive first-look shopping opportunity and reception. Attendees get free weekend passes to Indian Market and Festival.

    IMF AfterGlow
    9 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    Price: Free for AGAVE members and $15/non-members and non-Indian Market and Festival Preview Party attendees
    Grab a glow stick and join us for beverages, dancing, desserts and entertainment by the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long. Interact with artists in a relaxed setting along the canal and underneath The Sails of the Eiteljorg. Call (317) 275-1333 to make reservations.

    Time, Tickets and Parking
    - Indian Market and Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in White River State Park’s Military Park, just north of the museum in downtown Indianapolis.

    - Discounted advanced tickets for the event are on sale at the Eiteljorg Museum, on the museum’s website and Marsh Supermarkets or by calling 1-800-622-2024.

    - Advance sale tickets are $10. Tickets during the market are $12 at the gate. Kids 17 and under are FREE. Admission to the Eiteljorg is included.

    - White River State Park underground garage next to the Eiteljorg Museum and IUPUI parking lots across from Military Park provides the most convenient and inexpensive parking for this event. Shuttles to and from the museum are available.

    -Parking in the White River State Park garage will not be validated Indian Market weekend.

    For even more information about what’s happening Indian Market weekend, and to purchase advance sale tickets, visit Indian Market & Festival info.

    Go comment!




  • Deadwood | Cooperation and Conflict

    by Johanna M. Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator | May 04, 2015

     P_38839- deadwood south dakota
    Deadwood, South Dakota, ca. 1876
    Photographer: Howard
    Image courtesy of Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center, Los Angeles; P.38839
     
    Chinamen had no rights in the Hills that the whites were bound to respect, but it is different now. The celestials receive the same protection in our courts of law that white men are favored with.
    Black Hills Daily Times, October 23, 1877

    The white man is in the Black Hills like maggots, and I want you to get them out as quick as you can. The chief of all thieves (General Custer) made a road into the Black Hills last summer, and I want the Great Father to pay the damages for what Custer has done.
    —Baptiste Good, 1875

    Like many gold rush communities, Deadwood was a hub of human activity. Its population was diverse, composed of immigrants drawn by the gold discovery from far and wide to a region that had already been home to the Lakota for generations.

    In some cases, people from different backgrounds found ways to cooperate with one another. For example, the Chinese population of Deadwood found an ally in Jewish businessman Solomon Star. During his twenty-two years as mayor, Star did much to protect the interests and traditions of the Chinese community. In other cases, people could not surmount their differences and conflict ensued. Deadwood was illegally located on Lakota land, and hostilities between the town’s new residents and the Lakota persisted for many years.02678u- the race

      The Race. The Great Hub-and-Hub Race at Deadwood, Dak., July 4, 1888, Between the Only Two Chinese Hose Teams in the United States, 1888
    Photgrapher: John C. H. Grabill
    Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division; LC-DIG-ppmsc-02678

    Go comment!
© Eiteljorg Museum. All rights reserved.