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  • Indian Market & Festival | The 1491s

    by Jaq Nigg, Eiteljorg festivals and markets manager | Jun 16, 2015

    As Indian Market and Festival draws near, we’d like to tell you about some of the things we’re extra excited about.

    #1: The 1491s are coming! The 1491s are coming!

    Performing both Saturday and Sunday at 1:30pm at Indian Market and Festival as well as a sneak performance at the Friday night Preview Party, the comedy group The 1491s

     1491sgroupF

    Our official descriptions of The 1491s:

    Admired by fans for poking fun of stereotypes and offering unexpected insights into contemporary Native American life, the sketch comedy group 1491s has received national recognition for their mix of irreverent, ironic and highly infectious humor. Recently featured on a segment of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart that focused on issues surrounding the name of the Washington NFL team, the 1491s don’t shy away from uncomfortable subjects. Using performance art and social media, they have built a large following challenging perceptions and taking aim at the appropriation of Indigenous cultures.

    In their own words (from their website):

    The 1491s comedy group is based in the wooded ghettos of Minnesota and buffalo grass of Oklahoma. They are a gaggle of Indians chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of Indigenous satire. They coined the term “All My Relations,” and are still waiting for the royalties. They were at Custer’s Last Stand. They mooned Chris Columbus when he landed. They invented bubble gum.

     

    1491s - courtesy of 1491s 

    Basically, the 1491s are funny. But, don’t take our word for it. Check out some of their videos:

    Indian Store

    Honor Song

    I’m an Indian Too

    Represent – Jingle Dance

    Before the kick-off of Indian Market, the Eiteljorg will host two parties Friday, June 26 – the official IMF Preview Party and the AfterGlow party featuring the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long.

    Preview Party Details
    5:30 p.m. – 9 p.m.
    Price: $90/members $100/non-members
    An exclusive first-look shopping opportunity and reception. Attendees get free weekend passes to Indian Market and Festival.

    IMF AfterGlow
    9 p.m. – 11 p.m.
    Price: Free for AGAVE members and $15/non-members and non-Indian Market and Festival Preview Party attendees
    Grab a glow stick and join us for beverages, dancing, desserts and entertainment by the 1491s and DJ Kyle Long. Interact with artists in a relaxed setting along the canal and underneath The Sails of the Eiteljorg. Call (317) 275-1333 to make reservations.

    Time, Tickets and Parking
    - Indian Market and Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., in White River State Park’s Military Park, just north of the museum in downtown Indianapolis.

    - Discounted advanced tickets for the event are on sale at the Eiteljorg Museum, on the museum’s website and Marsh Supermarkets or by calling 1-800-622-2024.

    - Advance sale tickets are $10. Tickets during the market are $12 at the gate. Kids 17 and under are FREE. Admission to the Eiteljorg is included.

    - White River State Park underground garage next to the Eiteljorg Museum and IUPUI parking lots across from Military Park provides the most convenient and inexpensive parking for this event. Shuttles to and from the museum are available.

    -Parking in the White River State Park garage will not be validated Indian Market weekend.

    For even more information about what’s happening Indian Market weekend, and to purchase advance sale tickets, visit Indian Market & Festival info.

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  • Deadwood | Cooperation and Conflict

    by Johanna M. Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator | May 04, 2015

     P_38839- deadwood south dakota
    Deadwood, South Dakota, ca. 1876
    Photographer: Howard
    Image courtesy of Braun Research Library Collection, Autry National Center, Los Angeles; P.38839
     
    Chinamen had no rights in the Hills that the whites were bound to respect, but it is different now. The celestials receive the same protection in our courts of law that white men are favored with.
    Black Hills Daily Times, October 23, 1877

    The white man is in the Black Hills like maggots, and I want you to get them out as quick as you can. The chief of all thieves (General Custer) made a road into the Black Hills last summer, and I want the Great Father to pay the damages for what Custer has done.
    —Baptiste Good, 1875

    Like many gold rush communities, Deadwood was a hub of human activity. Its population was diverse, composed of immigrants drawn by the gold discovery from far and wide to a region that had already been home to the Lakota for generations.

    In some cases, people from different backgrounds found ways to cooperate with one another. For example, the Chinese population of Deadwood found an ally in Jewish businessman Solomon Star. During his twenty-two years as mayor, Star did much to protect the interests and traditions of the Chinese community. In other cases, people could not surmount their differences and conflict ensued. Deadwood was illegally located on Lakota land, and hostilities between the town’s new residents and the Lakota persisted for many years.02678u- the race

      The Race. The Great Hub-and-Hub Race at Deadwood, Dak., July 4, 1888, Between the Only Two Chinese Hose Teams in the United States, 1888
    Photgrapher: John C. H. Grabill
    Image courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division; LC-DIG-ppmsc-02678

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  • Gold! Riches and Ruin |Natives and Outsiders

    by Johanna Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator | Mar 26, 2015

    For years George Carmack, the son of a California forty-niner, took credit as the first to discover gold in the Klondike in 1896. However, two First Nations men who were related to him by marriage may have been the first. Historians now acknowledge that Skookum Jim Mason, the brother of Carmack’s wife, Kate, and Tagish (or Dawson) Charley likely made the find. Regardless, as the word spread it triggered a massive stampede to the Far North.

    The Canadian government foresaw the need to establish a law enforcement presence along the border between the United States and Canada, and in the communities growing and developing in response to the gold rush. The rapid increase in population led to the Yukon Territory’s establishment as a province. Many American gold seekers didn’t realize at first that the discovery existed in another country, and they chafed under Canadian authority.

    A vibrant and diverse indigenous population had long occupied the region. Because of their familiarity with the landscape, many First Nations people were hired as packers and guides on the trails to Dawson, and some worked mining claims. Although many of the outsiders adopted aspects of Native culture, such as wearing parkas and mukluks, overall the Yukon-Klondike gold rush led to the systematic degradation of the Native cultures in the region. 

     NWMP Constables Leason

    Klondikers and Indian Packers                      

     [TOP]
    NWMP Constables Leason, Cutting, Brown, Harrington, Ward, Livingstone, Campbell and Ball posing on White Pass Summit beside Union Jack and US Flag with Unidentified Civilian at Extreme Right, 1899
    Image courtesy of Royal Canadian Mounted Police Historical Collections Unit; 1933.8.1

    [BOTTOM]
    Klondikers and Indian Packers near Stone House, Chilkoot Trail, Alaska, 1897
    Photographer: Frank LaRoche
    Image courtesy of University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections; LaRoche 10042

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  • New Art 2.0 | Dyani White Hawk

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Feb 02, 2015

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes this Sunday, Feb. 8, 2015.

    Litho Moc
    Litho Moc, 2014
    Lithograph, edition 5/9
    28 x 22 ½ inches
    Dyani White Hawk Understanding II_full image
    Understanding II, 2013
    Lithograph, edition 6/15
    22 ¾ x 17 ¼ inches

    As a woman of Lakota and European ancestry, my life experiences have been a continual negotiation of both Western and Indigenous educations, value systems, and worldviews. Through the amalgamation of symbols and motifs derivative of both Lakota and Western abstraction, my artwork examines, dissects, and patches back together pieces of each in a means to provide an honest representation of self and culture.

    Dyani White Hawk (Sicangu Lakota, born 1976) was born in Madison, Wisconsin, and resides in St. Paul, Minnesota. She received a bachelor of fine arts degree from the Institute of American Indian Arts and a master of fine arts degree in painting from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. White Hawk’s work often combines Lakota quillwork design with strong lines that echo blanket and moccasin patterns. Her care in using her abstractions to bring American Indian tradition into a dynamic contemporary context reveals a powerful intellect and remarkable originality.

    new art sponsors

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  • New Art 2.0 | Marie Watt

    by by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Feb 02, 2015

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes this Sunday, Feb. 8, 2015.

    Marie Watt, Camp
     
    Camp, 2011
    Woodcut, edition 15/20
    20 ¾ x 16 inches

    Born to a Wyoming rancher and Seneca mother, Marie Watt (Seneca)has described herself as half cowboy, half Indian. Deeply studied in art, Watt says she "consciously draw[s] from indigenous design principles, oral traditions, and personal experience to shape the inner logic of the work I make." Much of her work, including that created at Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts, captures the texture and stories inherent in everyday objects. Watt was awarded an Eiteljorg Fellowship for Native American Fine Art in 2005. 
     
    Lodge, Marie Watt
    Lodge, 2005
    Woodcut, edition 20/20
    16 ½ x 14 inches 
    Plow, Marie Watt
    Plow, 2011
    Woodcut, edition 15/20
    20 ¾ x 16 inches
    Tether, Marie Watt
    Tether, 2011
    Woodcut, edition 15/20
    20 ¾ x 16 inches

    New art sponsors

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