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  • Native Arts magazine trains museum spotlight on the Eiteljorg

    by | | Aug 22, 2018

    Native Arts Magazine, a publication of Santa Fean Magazine, included the Eiteljorg in its August “museum spotlight” issue. To read it, click on the link:
    Native Arts Magazine -- Santa Fean





  • Bloomington Herald Times looks at "Interwoven" and "The Reel West"

    by | | Jul 30, 2018
    The Bloomington Herald Times newspaper on July 29 published a lengthy article about exhibits at the Eiteljorg Museum, focusing on "Interwoven: Native American Basketry from the Mel and Joan Perelman Collection" and "The Reel West."  Read the article at this link:
    Bloomington Herald Times story 7.29.18





  • Favorite artists return and new features enliven the 26th annual Indian Market & Festival

    by | | Jun 08, 2018

    2017 Indian Market & Festival

    Indian Market is a fascinating opportunity to meet Native artists from many cultures across the U.S. and Canada.

    One of the region’s most memorable art and cultural experiences, the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival will be celebrated the weekend of June 23-24. This year will feature lively performances, talented artists, a new Market Morning Breakfast on Saturday morning and much more.

    Now in its 26th year, Indian Market and Festival is a fascinating opportunity for visitors to meet artists from more than 50 Native American cultures from across the U.S. and Canada. Seasoned art collectors and first-time market-goers alike will appreciate the personal interactions and wide variety of artwork represented, including jewelry, pottery, basketry, carvings, sculptures, paintings, prints and other fine art.

    Held on the beautiful Eiteljorg grounds, Indian Market and Festival features artists’ booths both outside and inside the museum. Cultural experiences are a big part of the weekend, and this year’s live performances include music, dancing and storytelling.

    “Visitors often say Indian Market and Festival broadens their cultural horizons by allowing them and their families to experience Native American art for the first time and meet the exceptional artists,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “Experienced art collectors always enjoy the opportunity to purchase Native art close to home without traveling out West. Non-collectors bask in the memorable market and festival experience. And returning artists appreciate the Hoosier hospitality and the opportunity to get reacquainted with old friends and meet new collectors and fans.”

    Indian Market jewelry

    Intricate Native jewelry from many cultures is sold at the market.

    After a modest start in 1993, Indian Market and Festival now is considered one of the top Native art markets in the nation. Artists are invited to participate through a juried selection and must be members of a federally or state recognized tribe. Judges award ribbons and cash prizes to winners in multiple divisions.

    Each of the past 25 years, a work of art shown at Indian Market was chosen as that year’s signature image, featured on commemorative Indian Market T-shirts. For the 26th market, the judging committee this year chose not one but three signature images: Purest of Love by Michelle Lowden (Acoma Pueblo), Tu’utuli by Gabriel Ayala (Pascua Yaqui) and Four Ravens by Gordon Coons (Ojibwa/Ottawa/Chippewa). Three T-shirt designs depicting the signature images will be available through the Museum Store.

    2017 Indian Market & Festival inside

    Market-goers can meet Native artists and purchase their beautiful art.

    Also new this year is the Market Morning Breakfast, held at 8 a.m. Saturday, June 23, for early birds who want to meet the artists in a more relaxed setting before big crowds arrive. Reservations are required for the Saturday breakfast; contact mwhistler@eiteljorg.com or 317.275.1316 for details.

    For the general public, Indian Market will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days, June 23-24. Adult tickets are $15 at the gate. Advance tickets can be ordered online for $13 at www.eiteljorg.org or by calling 317.636.WEST (9378). Youth ages 17 and under are free at Indian Market. For Eiteljorg Museum members, free admission to the market is available for the individual named on the membership card, but the admission fee will apply for their non-member adult guests.

    Tickets to Indian Market includes museum admission, so plan to take advantage of the air-conditioning, Museum Café, beautiful galleries and special exhibitions The Reel West, Interwoven and Harry Fonseca: The Art of Living. Parking is available in the White River State Park underground garage while spaces last. Popular food vendors return, and artist demonstrations and art-making opportunities for the entire family will be available both days.

    Performers on the Indian Market Stage, June 23-24

    1. Gabriel Ayala - performerClassical guitarist Gabriel Ayala (Pascua Yaqui) performs classical music, jazz and flamenco and has released several albums. From Tucson, Arizona, Ayala has performed at the Kennedy Center and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian and won numerous music industry awards. Ayala also is a fine artist and will
    be showing his work at Indian Market. He performs at 11:45 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. both June 23 and 24.

    2. Kalyn Fay - performerSinger-songwriter Kalyn Fay (Cherokee) is part of the vibrant folk music scene in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and has made an impression with her first album, a mix of country, folk and rock original compositions about her life and journey. She performs at 10:15 a.m. and 2:15 p.m. both June 23 and 24.






    3. Dana Warrington - performer New PhotoTraditional dancer Dana Warrington (Prairie Band of Potawatomi/Menominee) also is an award-winning visual artist who creates quillwork and beadwork. His piece Family Traditions won the Best of Show award at last year’s Indian Market. A featured dance performer, Warrington has won several championships and creates his own dance regalia. He performs at 1:15 p.m. both June 23 and 24.   


    4. Tchin - performerStoryteller Tchin (Narragansett) is an award-winning metalsmith, flute-maker, educator, folklorist, musician and culture-bearer. Through the art of oral tradition, Tchin will share stories passed down through generations. He performs at 12:30 p.m. and 4:15 p.m. both June 23 and 24. 



    5. Buddy Big Mountain- performerEntertainer Buddy Big Mountain (Mohawk of Kahnawake Tribe of Canada) is a master puppeteer who blends his own grassroots style of comedy while sharing knowledge of his American Indian heritage. He performs at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. both June 23 and 24.





    To see the Indian Market and Festival entertainment performance schedule, click here


    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • Experience Miami culture, Sandhill Cranes on Eiteljorg tour Nov. 3

    by | | Jun 06, 2018

    Sandhill Cranes
    Sandhill Cranes at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area

    Join the Eiteljorg Museum staff on Nov. 3 for an all-day coach trip to northern Indiana focusing on the Miami Tribe and the fall migration of the Sandhill Crane. This is an ideal tour for those interested in Native American and Indiana history and for nature lovers.

    Learn about the Miami during stops at cultural sites important to the tribe’s history, including Seven Pillars near Peru, Indiana. We will arrive at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area during a peak time to witness thousands of Sandhill Cranes stopping to rest during their migration.

    Seven Pillars
    Seven Pillars near Peru, Ind.

    Spaces on the 32-seat motor coach are going fast. Eiteljorg members are $150 per person; non-members are $175. Cost includes travel by coach, lunch and dinner. For more information or to register, contact Martha Hill at mhill@eiteljorg.com or 317.275.1377.

    Sandhill Cranes at Sunset
    Sandhill Cranes at sunset


    Images by John Vanausdall



    This article originally appeared in the June 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • Grand and beautiful Native basketry exhibit reflects Perelmans’ generosity

    by | | Feb 22, 2018

    Perelman baskets exhibit

    A new exhibition at the Eiteljorg showcases the work of some of the most admired Native American basketmakers while celebrating two of the museum’s most generous supporters: Mel and Joan Perelman.

    The Perelmans recently gifted to the museum their collection of 147 baskets, cradles and bags spanning much of North America, with a particular focus on the Southwest and Far West regions. This gift is meaningful, as it fills gaps in the museum’s existing collections. A selection of objects will be featured in a special exhibit, Interwoven: Native American Basketry from the Mel and Joan Perelman Collection, in the Paul Gallery from April 14 to Aug. 5.

    “The Eiteljorg Museum has benefitted profoundly from the generosity of Mel and Joan Perelman over the past two decades,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “Their exquisite judgment in collecting fine art of Native America and the West is reflected in this outstanding collection, representing many cultures, that the public will be fascinated to see. In light of the extraordinary quality of this basket collection in particular, it’s appropriate that we share it with the public.”

    These baskets are symbolic of the resiliency of Native peoples and are primarily the works of women, including Louisa Keyser (Washoe), Lena Dick (Washoe), Elizabeth Juan (Tohono O’odham), Lucy Telles (Paiute), Magdelena Augustine (Chemehuevi) and others, some whose names were not recorded. The baskets contain the love, care, and knowledge passed down through multiple generations that contributed to the survival of many Native communities despite dramatic and traumatic transitions of the late 19th through early 20th centuries.

    Crucial to the continuation of these arts is the inter-generational transmitting of knowledge about what materials work best for specific purposes, where to gather materials and the proper care and harvesting of materials; while also leaving room for innovation and personal taste in form, designs, and incorporating new materials. All are woven into each item. While many of the baskets have utilitarian roots, they also represent adaptation to a market economy. Some were made specifically for sale, such as the Washoe degikup, a globular basket form, developed in the 1890s. Other baskets range from the grand — an Apache olla basket measuring 26 inches tall and 24 inches in diameter — to an incredibly intricate and diminutive Makah basket.

    While the collection is mainly of baskets, it also encompasses Lower Klamath River basketry hats and other forms of woven items such as a Hoopa cradle and Nez Perce twined bag. The Perelmans also collected the work of living artists from numerous communities who continue the traditions and innovations seen in these earlier works.

    Love, care, and knowledge: These words not only apply to the many Native artists and their creations within the collection, but also to the Perelmans themselves. The Perelmans are among the museum’s most active supporters, and Mel serves on the board of directors. A previous Eiteljorg show, Spirited Connoisseurs in 2004, featured Western paintings and Native pottery, baskets and Katsina figures the Perelmans collected. The museum’s expansion wing, which was built in 2005 and doubled the size of the building, is named for them.

    To honor Mel and Joan Perelman for their support of Native fine arts and the museum, the Eiteljorg will host a special gala celebration Thursday, June 21. If you would like to join us in recognizing the Perelmans’ generosity, please visit www.eiteljorg.org or email mwhistler@eiteljorg.com for information about reservations.


    SPECIAL EXHIBIT
    Interwoven: Native American Basketry from the Mel and Joan Perelman Collection
    Gerald and Dorit Paul Gallery, Eiteljorg Museum
    April 14–August 5

    Gala celebration, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 21, presented by Oxford Financial Group, LTD.
    Co-chairs of the gala are John and Sarah Lechleiter.


    Image Caption: 

    (From left to right) Feather and yarn Tubatulabal basket, ca. 1905; Apache olla, 1918; feather basket by Rose Anderson (Pomo); two quilled birch bark containers by Bernard Parley (Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa), 1995; beaded Pomo basket, ca. 1870.
    Gift of Mel and Joan Perelman

     

    This article originally appeared in the February 2018 issue of Storyteller magazine.

     


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