Menu
Blog
Eiteljorg Musuem Blog
  • Eiteljorg Winter Market | Handmade art for sale Saturday, Dec. 7

    by Jaq Nigg, Festivals and Markets Manager | Nov 29, 2013

    From 10 a.m. - 5p.m., Saturday, Dec. 7, shop the season’s best regional art market featuring handmade jewelry, purses, crafts and edible art and more from over 30 artists.

    What makes the Eiteljorg Winter Market so special? We asked the artists:

    Cathy Claycomb
    Saddlebag Purses 
    Cathy Claycomb
    The time of year is just right for holiday shoppers and Winter Market is perfect for my product.  Where would be a better place to offer purses made from cowboy boots than the Eiteljorg?  The shoppers are excited about the museum and the artists.  It’s a fabulous day and one of my favorite shows!

    Tom O. Reed 
    Artistic Wooden Cooking Utensils

    Winter Market is lovely because the Eiteljorg is so beautiful and pleasurable to be in. Visitors are smart and seem to truly appreciate the arts. The mood of the event is full of the holiday spirit... and that makes for a pleasant and rewarding day for everyone.

    Holli La Vigne
    Boris Loved Natasha – Fun and colorful bags

    Winter Market brings together a diverse group of high-quality artists in a beautiful setting. The museum patrons, those first time museum visitors, the staff, and the fellow vendors make for an exciting, holiday-anticipating, fun-filled day that shouldn't be missed!

    Peg Neal 
    Ceramics
     
    I’ve had the privilege of participating in Winter Market since its origin in 2002. The things that bring me back each year:
    1. The quality and mix of the art for sale.
    2. The audience the market attracts is fun and has the holiday spririt. 
    3. The staff obviously has the artists in mind throughout planning.
    4. The ease of booth set up and tear down.
    5. The wonderfully helpful volunteers.
    6. I just love being in that beautiful building.

    Carrie Abbot
    New Fangled Confections – Sweet Treats

    I sell wholesale to many stores and restaurants, but interacting with people face-to-face at Winter Market feels right. I love to see the reaction when someone tries my crazy-delicious candy for the first time. I believe in the importance and power of local partnerships. The Eiteljorg has such an obvious respect and love for every kind of artisan – visual, musical, performance, edible. 
      
    Winter Market features activities for the whole family, including Jingle Rails: The Great Western Adventure, a locomotive wonderland featuring trains racing past astonishingly detailed local and Western landmarks made of natural materials.

    There's also our amazing Fellowship exhibit in our main gallery. There, you'll see the work of five Native contemporary artists whose work and respect in the field earned them a cash prize and the extraordinary opportunity to exhibit their work at the Eiteljorg.

    Kids of all ages can also explore The R.B. Annis Western Family Experience, an interactive area that immerses visitors in the lives of a diverse group of Westerners and offers the chance to decorate and raise a totem pole, build a sod house, climb aboard a true-to-life stagecoach and more.

    After a day of holiday shopping and exploring the West, take a break in the Café and warm up with some Southwestern fare. Finish your visit to the Eiteljorg with a stop in at the Museum Store, to find great gifts for your whole family.

    Go comment!




  • Meet the Fellows | Meryl McMaster (Part IV of V)

    by Ashley Holland (Cherokee), Eiteljorg assistant curator of Contemporary Art | Oct 30, 2013

    Each week the Eiteljorg blog will profile artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Meryl McMaster: Immeasurable, the Art of Being, by Ashley Holland 
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog).

    Meryl McMaster
    (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)

    Photo credit: Ian Clark

    My artistic practice begins with photography evoking a journey that follows a path of self-discovery….My art unravels notions of identity and subjectivity as something that is never complete, but always in process and always formed from within. -
    Meryl McMaster

    Meryl McMaster’s work creates a paradigm of the artist as visual philosopher. Her pursuit of knowledge, connection to the natural world, and relentless dedication to profound beauty make her photographs sumptuous and complex. They are a world unto themselves. She invites the viewers to join her in this world, to take what they may, and to grow from their own conclusions.

    McMaster was born to a Euro-Canadian mother and Plains Cree/Blackfoot father in 1988. Her father, Gerald McMaster, is a well-known artist, author, and curator of Canadian aboriginal contemporary art. There is little question that this upbringing gave McMaster a great well of cultural and ancestral memory in which to immerse and emerge as herself. It is also of no small consequence that she, as an early career artist, exists in the era of important cultural and social movements such as Idle No More, in which Canada’s aboriginal people strive to reclaim their place and rights in their communities locally, provincially, and nationally. No doubt this influences her political and social views, of which her photographs act as a visual record.


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Anima (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Wingeds Calling (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Aphoristic Currents (In-Between Worlds series), 2013
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund

    McMaster conceptualizes her work and then proceeds to use the moment, the environment, and the circumstance of that particular sequence to document the culmination of her vision. She has a space in her home where elements and concepts are envisioned and created as the stepping-stones to the act of photographing. For McMaster, the camera becomes an object that is vulnerable and dependent on the environment around it.

    McMaster’s photographs continue to grow stronger as she adds layer upon layer of experience toward the spiritual maturity she seeks. Her constant exploration of identity and search for (self) realization translate beautifully into lush images with each subject she captures. Her photography series  In-Between Worlds , Ancestral , and Second Self demonstrate the potency of her artistic message. It is not surprising that one so interested in pursuit of the elevation of the human spirit and self-consciousness about her bi-cultural heritage would choose to work in the form of a photographic series, as if to better investigate a world, a view, through a multi-dimensional lens and a plethora of sculptural, cultural, and natural materials. 

    Meet Meryl McMaster, Friday, Nov. 8 at the Eiteljorg.

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
    Meryl is one of five 2013 Fellows and her artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.”

    Go comment!




  • Day of the Dead | This Saturday

    by Linda Montag-Olson, Eiteljorg public programs manager | Oct 25, 2013


    Skulls, skeletons and marigolds, are important elements of ofrendas (altars) created to honor and celebrate the lives of family, friends and ancestors who have passed on. Fresh foods, candles, photographs and personal items are also placed on the public and private ofrendas, to welcome the spirits return for a brief restful visit on Nov.2. This is the essence of Día de los Muertos, a traditional Mexican holiday, with roots in Aztec culture and Catholic traditions.

    On Saturday, Oct. 26, join us for the annual Day of the Dead celebration at the Eiteljorg. Museum guests will have a chance to remember their loved ones by adding a note or paper flower to the public ofrenda, create a personal altar to take home and pick up a recipe to make their own version of pan de muertos (bread of the dead).

    Ongoing short films (20 minutes) will show traditional Día de los Muertos festivities in the Mexican cities of Janitzio and Oaxaca, and give an authentic glimpse into the culture.

    Visiting artists and musical performers will share lively traditions with museum guests.

    Marvel at artist Beatriz Schlebecker’s intricate, brightly colored works of tissue paper art called papel picado (cut paper). Beatriz lives in Indiana and has been exploring and creating contemporary papel picado for ten years.

    Richard Gabriel Jr. fashions tin into shiny ornaments. He’ll lend you a hammer to make your own piece to take home. Richard lives in Tjeras, New Mexico and is a recent award winner at the Spanish Market in Santa Fe. 
     
    Anderson Ballet Folklorico will delight with swirling skirts and stomping feet - you can’t help but clap your hands and tap your own feet. Comparsa Tlahuicas volunteers will share the history of their amazing traditional costumes, masks and headgear as you sway to the beat of the performers.

    Dia de los Muertos celebrations are held across the United States in November as more and more people learn about the holiday from friends and neighbors and embrace the traditions of Day of the Dead. Plan a visit to the museum on Oct. 26 and join in the celebration!

    Go comment!




  • Bid on High-End Navajo Rugs, Oct. 5, at the Eiteljorg

    by Robert Tate, Eiteljorg director of merchandising | Sep 24, 2013

    On Saturday, Oct. 5, Eiteljorg members and visitors can raise their hands to bid on more than 200 Navajo rugs during the museum's annual auction. This year, Trader and auctioneer Bruce Burnham has honored our invitation to share his love and knowledge about contemporary and vintage Navajo rugs.
     
    Burnham’s family has been in the trading business for five generations, which makes him uniquely qualified to answer questions about collecting and displaying Navajo rugs and weavings. 

    The Burnham’s Trading Post is some 40 miles west of Gallup, New Mexico in Northeastern Arizona. Each year, they sell more than $1 million in rugs at 18 auctions. Proceeds from each sale go directly to the Navajo artists who created the rugs or weavings.  The artists gather at the trading post when he returns from auctions to collect their earnings. 

    Burnham, himself, lives on the Navajo reservation where his family has been trading rugs for more than 30 years. When asked recently whether he thought rug weaving was a dying art, he told the Arizona Daily Courier, “It’s not a dying art. There has never been a time you couldn’t open the back of a store and haul out more rugs than you can sell.”

    The Eiteljorg is privileged to have such a special relationship with the Burnham family.  According to their website, the Burnhams are credited with helping to develop several distinct rug styles including the New Lands Raised Outline, Burntwater, Germantown Revival and Spider Rock. Bruce Burnham is known nationwide for his expertise in buying and selling and his company’s innovation and quality in Navajo textiles. You can get a sense of what the Burnhams will bring to Indianapolis for auction if you visit their website at www.rbburnhamtrading.com

    We believe this auction is the perfect opportunity for visitors to add to their collection or for new collectors to purchase a first rug or weaving. Those who attend the preview also have the benefit of holding rugs in their hands and examining them up close. The "Members-only" preview is also a great cultural experience which gives visitors an opportunity to learn about Navajo art.  

    Rugs sold at the event will range from $100 to $10,000. The average rug will sell for $350.

    If you’d like to see and feel one of the rugs that will be on display, make a trip to the Eiteljorg Museum Store where we have a 4X6 contemporary rug from R.B. Burnham & Co. on display.

    Schedule:
    8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
    Navajo Trader and auctioneer Bruce Burnham leads “Members only” chat 
    *Eiteljorg members only

    9:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
    General public arrives for auction preview

    11:30 a.m. – Navajo rug auction begins

    Go comment!




  • The best of the West head to Indy for Quest Art Show and Sale

    by James H. Nottage, vice president and chief curatorial officer | Aug 26, 2013

    Walks in Beauty, 2013
    John Coleman, Walks in Beauty, 2013
    Bronze, 24x19x12 inches

    High-end paintings and sculptures, spirited discussions about Western art, plus the chance to meet artists and collectors in the comfort of a Hoosier home – three reasons you won’t want to miss the eighth annual Quest for the West® art show and sale! Quest begins Friday, Sept. 6 with several events. Then it’s game on Saturday, Sept. 7 with the thrilling sale.  The exhibit opens to the public Sunday, Sept. 8, and will run through Oct., 6.  Excitement is building, registration is up and there’s a palpable buzz in the world of Western art.
     
    Robert Griffing, Family, 2013
    Oil, 46x42 inches
    On sale during Quest


    Scott Tallman Powers, Hidden Melodies, 2013
    Oil, 20x18 inches
    On sale during Quest

    Daniel Smith, The Suitor, 2013
    Acrylic, 24x36 inches
    On sale during Quest
     
    Quest has grown in stature as one of the top shows of its kind in the nation, based upon the reputations of the participating artists, their work  and our delivery of first-class hospitality. Another Quest is the presentation of the Artist of Distinction award. This year’s honoree is John Coleman.  

    Best known for his sculptural portrayal of the American story through depictions of 19th century Native people, Coleman will be honored with a solo exhibit in the museum’s Paul Gallery, through Nov. 17. The Coleman exhibit acknowledges the quality of his work submitted to Quest and celebrates his long-term achievements. Coleman’s show will feature his best known sculptures including a major series of ten figures inspired by the 1830s work of painters George Catlin and Karl Bodmer. They traveled separately up the Missouri River to record members of the Mandan, Hidatsa, and other tribes.  Also included in the show are paintings and drawings for which the artist is increasingly well known. 

    On Saturday afternoon of the opening weekend, guests of the event will be able to enjoy a special panel presentation featuring three artists and their spouses. We expect it to be a rousing discussion about how couples work together during the creation, promotion, and marketing of the art.

    Most of the nearly 50 Quest artists wil be in attendance and five new artists are included: John Moyers, Mike Desatnick, C. Michael Dudash, Logan Maxwell Hagege, and Blair Buswell.  Museum staff and our collaborators in the museum’s support group, the Western Art Society, think you will find this presentation of Quest even better than last year! Visit Quest pages on the museum’s website to see work by all the artists.

     John Coleman, Artist of Distinction (pictured)

    Since receiving the Artist of Distinction Award in 2012, John Coleman has graciously worked with the Eiteljorg as we planned his special exhibition that opens to the public Sept.  8. Coleman devoted himself to art after a career in contracting and construction.  He became a member of the prestigious Cowboy Artists of America in 2001, joined Quest in 2006 and is a frequent winner of major awards for works shown at these and other shows.  He speaks with ease and enthusiasm about art and his subjects. 

    “[I tell] a story that is deeper than what you see on the surface, and that conveys an underlying emotion or mood. . . .I find Native American culture has so many stories that lend themselves to being told visually and in
    ways people understand.”

    Coleman draws inspiration from the art of others and surrounds himself with paintings, sculptures, and examples of Plains Indian clothing, weapons, and accessories.  A large library of art and history books makes the accomplishments of others accessible to him. His bronze sculptures, drawings, and paintings that will go on exhibit at the Eiteljorg are usually featured in private collections across the country.

    “I want to draw you in, to convey a story about life and to share something about the lives of others,” he said.

    Coleman says he holds the idea of art at a high plane.

    Visitors to his exhibition, Honored Life, The Art of John Coleman will be able to enjoy what he has learned from art and history. 

    Go comment!
© Eiteljorg Museum. All rights reserved.