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  • New Art 2.0 | Introducing Corwin “Corky” Clairmont

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art, and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 09, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.

    Banana Polar Bear
    Banana Polar Bear, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22 ⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    Our Indian communities have thousands of years of history that need to be recognized and celebrated. We have many stories yet to tell from the past and the present as we are still here. - Corwin "Corky" Clairmong (Salish Kootenai)

    Corwin "Corky" Clairmont was born at the St. Ignatius Mission on the Flathead Reservation in Montana. In 1984, after living in Los Angeles for 14 years, Clairmont returned to the Flathead Reservation, where he lives and works today. Clairmont is part of an important group of Native American artists who use their cultural experiences and background in combination with techniques such as printmaking and photography to bring attention to the traditions and challenges that are part of the lives of Native people and their communities. Clairmont is a 2003 Eiteljorg Fellow and has exhibited his work across the U.S. His work is included in many public and private collections, including the Eiteljorg Museum’s permanent collection.

    Waiting for the ice
    Waiting for the Ice, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    More about Corky
    Corky is a celebrated contemporary artist, combining his experience as a native person and tribal member with a post-modernist view of the realities of life as indigenous people struggle to retain their identities and sovereignty into the 21st century. He is also a teacher, mentor and a community activist, and lives in Ronan. A member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Corky has been the art director at Salish Kootenai College since 1984. Previously, he was an instructor and printmaking department head at Otis/Parsons Art Institute in LA.

    Corky holds a BA from MSU, did a graduate fellowship at San Fernando State University and received an MFA from California State University at Los Angeles. His work has been exhibited from coast to coast and around the world, including Germany and New Zealand, and has been reviewed by the New York Times. He also designed the cover and emblem for the American Indian Library Association and a large granite warrior memorial for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation in 2007.

    Through the years, he has served on many professional boards, curated and juried many art shows, and he has received a Ford Foundation grant and NEA and MAC grants. Corky was also awarded the 2008 Montana Governor’s Arts Award for Visual Art. (Source: www.Montana.gov)
     
    New art sponsors

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  • New Art 2.0 | Exhibit and sale opens Saturday, Nov. 1

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt and Ashley Holland | Oct 29, 2014
    Bird Hat 

    Rick Bartow (Wiyot of Northern California), Bird Hat, 2013, monoprint, edition 1/1, 30 1/8 x 22 1/2 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    Collector. Patron. Donor. These are a few of the words museum insiders like to use. They sound impressive. How can someone become associated with one or all of these words? How do they become more than words that give meaning to people’s lives, both personally and for the public? It is art, but is it good? Who makes those determinations? How? It was these questions and ideas that led to the creation of New Art 2.0.

    Feddersen and Lavadour
    Feddersen (Colville Confederated Tribes) and James Lavadour (Walla Walla), Untitled (Amongst Friends series), 2010, monotype, edition 1/1, 15 x 22 3/8 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    The New Art of the West series is not a new concept. It is the exhibition that helped to establish the Eiteljorg contemporary collection and in particular planted the seed of interest in Native American contemporary work that has become the hallmark of the contemporary collection. The series promoted cultural variety and diverse traditions as well as time-honored practices in landscape, portraiture, and still life. New Art 2.0 takes its cue from the exhibition that produced nine shows and catalogues and highlighted the best emerging and established contemporary artists working in the West today.

    Eva Lake, Golden
    Eva Lake (American, born 1956), Golden no. 2, 2012, lithograph, edition 14/14, 30 x 30 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.
     
    We are grateful to the patrons and collectors who supported our initial efforts at collecting during the museum’s 25 years. As the museum looks to the next 25, it also ushers in a new generation of patrons and collectors with New Art 2.0. This next exhibition is a fitting complement to the collecting opportunities found in Quest for the West and our annual Indian Market and Festival.

    Working in partnership with Crow’s Shadow Institute of Art , with a little help from Todd Bockley Gallery in Minneapolis, Minnesota, New Art 2.0 includes prints by Native and non-Native contemporary artists and features many artists whose work is already in the Eiteljorg permanent contemporary collection. Native artists Joe Feddersen, Marie Watt, Jim Denomie, Truman Lowe, and Kay WalkingStick, to name a few, are coupled with non-Native artists such as Dale Chihuly and Storm Tharp.

    Damien Gilley, Everything Incorporated
    Damien Gilley, Everything Incorporated, 2014, lithograph, edition 1/12, 22 x 30 in. Print courtesy Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts. Photograph by Hadley Fruits.

    So to answer a few questions new patrons and collectors may have, owning artwork creates an affinity and affiliation with artists and organizations, and a curiosity and empathy for broadening world views. Patronage at any level indicates a responsibility and embodies idealism toward humanity and the musing of mere mortals.

    Can one piece of art really incite so much? We have seen it happen again and again. Let it happen to you.

     New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000. 
     
     

     

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  • Eiteljorg Fellow Wendy Red Star's Exhibit Opens Friday, June 6 at iMOCA

    by Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art | Jun 05, 2014


    Yakima Nation Youth Activities, Wendy Red Star, Archival Inkjet Print, 2014

    The Eiteljorg Museum has the privilege of partnering with Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art (iMOCA) to present the art of Wendy Red Star (Crow) in the exhibit Circling The Camp: Wendy Red Star. Red Star is a 2009 Eiteljorg Fellow and prolific artist. Thank you to Shauta Marsh, director, iMOCA for sharing her thoughts about contemporary art and Red Star's work in this interview with Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Curator Jennifer Complo McNutt. 

    More on Wendy Red Star from iMOCA's newsletter:
    Over the course of her practice, Wendy Red Star has worked within and between the mediums of photography, sculpture, installation, performance and design. Featured in Huffington Post and other publications, the 2009 Eiteljorg Fellow will open her solo exhibition with iMOCA June 6, from 6-11 p.m.  The exhibit will run through July 19th with the hours of Thursday- Saturday, 12 am-7 p.m.  

    Artist talk between Red Star and Eiteljorg Museum's Curator of Contemporary Art, Jennifer McNutt, is June 7 at 1 p.m.

    Red Star's work layers influences drawn from her tribal background (Crow), daily surroundings, collected ephemera and conjured histories that are both real and imagined. Through her photographs and sculpture new universes are built, simultaneously urban-rural and high-low with their own language of symbols created from such seemingly disparate sites as rez cars, powwow culture, indigenous commoditization, and Red Star's personal collection of memories growing up as a half-breed on the Crow Indian reservation.

    Wendy Red Star is an artist living and working in Portland, Oregon. Red Star received her B.F.A. from Montana State University-Bozeman and her M.F.A from UCLA in 2006. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally. Her exhibitions include shows at the Fondation Cartier pour l'Art Contemporain, Hallie Ford Museum, The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship 2009, Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, Domaine de Kerguéhennec, Laura Bartlett Gallery London, The Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Missoula Art Museum, St. Louis Art Museum, National Museum of the American Indian-New York, Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and the Bockley Gallery.

    Where/When
    Circling The Camp: Wendy Red Star
    iMOCA
    The Murphy Art Center, Fountain Square
    1043 Virginia Ave, Suite 5, Indianapolis 46203
    Thursday-Saturday, 1 p.m.-8 p.m.
    iMOCA is closed holidays and between exhibitions.
    Admission and parking are FREE.
    For more information please call 317.63i.MOCA

     

     

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  • Meet the Fellows | Meryl McMaster (Part IV of V)

    by Ashley Holland (Cherokee), Eiteljorg assistant curator of Contemporary Art | Oct 30, 2013

    Each week the Eiteljorg blog will profile artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Meryl McMaster: Immeasurable, the Art of Being, by Ashley Holland 
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog).

    Meryl McMaster
    (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)

    Photo credit: Ian Clark

    My artistic practice begins with photography evoking a journey that follows a path of self-discovery….My art unravels notions of identity and subjectivity as something that is never complete, but always in process and always formed from within. -
    Meryl McMaster

    Meryl McMaster’s work creates a paradigm of the artist as visual philosopher. Her pursuit of knowledge, connection to the natural world, and relentless dedication to profound beauty make her photographs sumptuous and complex. They are a world unto themselves. She invites the viewers to join her in this world, to take what they may, and to grow from their own conclusions.

    McMaster was born to a Euro-Canadian mother and Plains Cree/Blackfoot father in 1988. Her father, Gerald McMaster, is a well-known artist, author, and curator of Canadian aboriginal contemporary art. There is little question that this upbringing gave McMaster a great well of cultural and ancestral memory in which to immerse and emerge as herself. It is also of no small consequence that she, as an early career artist, exists in the era of important cultural and social movements such as Idle No More, in which Canada’s aboriginal people strive to reclaim their place and rights in their communities locally, provincially, and nationally. No doubt this influences her political and social views, of which her photographs act as a visual record.


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Anima (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Wingeds Calling (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Aphoristic Currents (In-Between Worlds series), 2013
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund

    McMaster conceptualizes her work and then proceeds to use the moment, the environment, and the circumstance of that particular sequence to document the culmination of her vision. She has a space in her home where elements and concepts are envisioned and created as the stepping-stones to the act of photographing. For McMaster, the camera becomes an object that is vulnerable and dependent on the environment around it.

    McMaster’s photographs continue to grow stronger as she adds layer upon layer of experience toward the spiritual maturity she seeks. Her constant exploration of identity and search for (self) realization translate beautifully into lush images with each subject she captures. Her photography series  In-Between Worlds , Ancestral , and Second Self demonstrate the potency of her artistic message. It is not surprising that one so interested in pursuit of the elevation of the human spirit and self-consciousness about her bi-cultural heritage would choose to work in the form of a photographic series, as if to better investigate a world, a view, through a multi-dimensional lens and a plethora of sculptural, cultural, and natural materials. 

    Meet Meryl McMaster, Friday, Nov. 8 at the Eiteljorg.

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
    Meryl is one of five 2013 Fellows and her artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.”

    Go comment!




  • Meet the Fellows | Nicholas Galanin (Part II of V)

    by DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg public relations manager | Oct 16, 2013

    Each week the Eiteljorg blog will profile artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Nicholas Galanin: Translate Transpose Transmit Shifting Indigenous Aesthetics  by Tania Willard (Secwepemc Nation)
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog).
      
    Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Aleut)

    Culture cannot be contained as it unfolds. My art enters this stream at different points, looking backards, looking forwards, generating its own sound and motion. - Nicholas Galanin 

    Alaskan-based Tlingit artist Nicholas Galanin’s work is a poignant example of straddling the remarkable interstice between traditional and contemporary art. The aesthetic classifications of "craft," "contemporary," and "traditional" and/or "Native art" all conjure particular sets of expectations. Galanin’s work plays with these expectations. His work travels two parallel paths. One path follows an expected trajectory in traditional carving and jewelry that his great-grandfather passed to his father. The second path veers off dramatically with inquiry into satire and iconoclasm, and encompasses more of the artist’s "contemporary" art practice seen in museums and galleries. However, the expected signifiers of cultural object or ethnographic art are undermined in his practice by the conceptual nature of his process. By outsourcing the production of some of his work, Galanin subverts the idea of the folkloric Indian artist and replaces that narrative with a sense of globalized craft that carries into Indian art and wider culture. Referencing and exploiting the interplay of art, culture, and commerce, Galanin’s work examines shifting cultures as if they were tectonic plates, the monumental movement within them creating faults, mountains, and earthquakes as cultures assimilate, adapt, and expropriate. 


    Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Aleut)
    I Think It Goes Like This?,
    2012
    Wood, paint
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund 

    An examination of the shifting nature of indigeneity can be seen in I Think it Goes Like This?, a seeming puzzle of dissected totem pole or sculptural elements, disassembled and installed as a pile of disparate but related elements. Painted matte black, the carvings protocol is all mixed up. Which clan animal goes where? The eagle is not on top. Is there even an eagle? Indians are all about eagles. The artist cuts up expectations and rule books in his push to question and innovate. As much as Galanin likes to mix up and target cultural stereotypes with satire, his work is also about having big heart and a deep respect for his cultural heritage. –Tania Willard (2013)

     
    Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Aleut)
    The American Dream is Alie and Well, 2012
    United States flag, felt, .50 caliber ammunition, foam, gold leaf, plastic
    collection of the artist

    Being brought up both in and away from my indigenous culture, I have experienced a very different perspective on my heritage than my great-grandparents would have known. The generational spread that our cultural community encompasses moves far beyond a romantic ideal commonly associated with the term “Indian Art.” We are being culturally dishonest if we reject all that passes through our culture. –Nicholas Galanin (2013)


    Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Aleut)
    No Indians or Dogs Allowed, 2008
    Neon, photography
    Courtesy of the Pratt Museum

    The piece [is] an investigation of historical and current prejudice and policies of persistent racism against indigenous people in the artist’s home of Alaska and globally. This work [includes] a neon sign that was placed in storefronts, an assertion of current political climates and a foray into new materials and media that [is] suggestive of the development of the artist’s later work.  –Tania Willard (2013)

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
     Nicholas is one of five 2013 Fellows and his artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.”

    Go comment!
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