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  • Beautiful and thought-provoking contemporary Native Art Now! exhibit will inspire

    by Eiteljorg Museum staff | Nov 01, 2017

    James_Lavadour_Naming_Tanager

    Do you want to see contemporary art that is surprising, challenging and intriguing? Such engaging artworks await you at the Eiteljorg Museum’s new exhibition Native Art Now!, which opens the weekend of Nov. 11-12.

    As home to one of the nation’s best collections of contemporary Native art, the Eiteljorg will showcase some of the most visually compelling pieces it has acquired over the past two decades. Native Art Now! will be on exhibit at the Eiteljorg until Jan. 28; then it will travel to other museums around the nation.

    So what exactly distinguishes contemporary Native art from other contemporary art?

    “The difference between a contemporary artist and a contemporary Native artist is about 15,000 years,” explained Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art at the Eiteljorg. “Contemporary Native artists have knowledge about their ancestors, traditions and cultures that spans thousands of years. That changes the way you see the world.”

    Rick Bartow_Fox Spirit
    Native contemporary artists had not received the same recognition as other contemporary artists, Complo McNutt said, but now the contemporary Native art field is coming into its own, admired and appreciated by scholars and collectors alike.

    That brings us to Indianapolis. To help support and sustain contemporary Native art, the Lilly Endowment Inc. for two decades has supported the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. Every other year since 1999, the Fellowship program has selected a new group of five Native artists and provided them grant support to further their careers and receive recognition. The Eiteljorg has purchased more than 200 contemporary works and received gifts of another 200 to add to its permanent collection. Thirty-nine significant examples are in Native Art Now! and will be on view in the museum’s special exhibition gallery.

    Dynamic and vibrant, the exhibit depicts the broad spectrum of Native art. You’ll see installations, paintings, photographs, prints, sculptures, glass, and textile art by Indigenous artists from across the U.S. and Canada, such as Rick Bartow, Jim Denomie, Harry Fonseca, Nicholas Galanin, Meryl McMaster, Holly Wilson and others. Many pieces speak to injustices against Native peoples and the resilience of Native cultures. Others encompass innovative styles and mediums, and are open to interpretation.

    And what would a Native art show be without Indian humor? You will experience that, too.

    Holly Wilson_Enough
    The traveling exhibit is one part of the Native Art Now! project. The weekend of Nov. 11-12, the Eiteljorg will host a celebration and convening of leading Native artists and scholars. It will include a facilitated dialogue, moderated by a nationally known art and social justice expert, Betsy Theobald Richards, to consider the past, present and future of contemporary Native art, as well as the future of the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship.

    The Eiteljorg and WFYI also collaborated on a one-hour documentary that presents personal perspectives on Native contemporary art.  It is scheduled to air at 8 p.m. Thursday Dec. 14 on WFYI-TV 20.1.

    The museum has produced a scholarly companion book for Native Art Now! that examines Native expression in contemporary art since 1992.

    When seeing Native Art Now!, don’t miss two other exhibits of contemporary Native art now on view at the Eiteljorg: In Their Honor, in the Hurt and Harvey galleries, and The Geometry of Expression, in the Myrta Pulliam Photography Gallery.

     

    NATIVE ART NOW!
    OPENING CELEBRATION AND CONVENING
    SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

    SATURDAY, NOV 11
    Artists and scholars will convene for a dialogue led by Betsy Theobald Richards. The morning and afternoon events and lunch together are $30 per person or $15 for students.
    10 a.m. to noon: Facilitated discussion
    Noon to 1 p.m.: Buffet lunch
    1–3 p.m.: Preview of clips from the Native Art Now! documentary followed by roundtable discussions.
    5–9 p.m.: Native Art Now! exhibit opening celebration. This evening event is $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers.

    SUNDAY, NOV 12
    10:30 a.m. to noon: Fellowship artists convening led by Betsy Theobald Richards. The Eiteljorg Fellows will deliberate on the Fellowship to help forge its future. This event is included with general admission and the public is invited to attend, but please register.
    To register to attend any of the events, contact Mary Whistler at 317.275.1316 or mwhistler@eiteljorg.com by Nov. 3 or log onto www.eiteljorg.org/NativeArtNow.

     

    Image Captions:

    James Lavadour (Walla Walla, born 1951)
    Naming Tanager, 2001
    Oil on wood
    Museum Purchase: Eiteljorg Fellowship. Acquisition in honor of Bonnie Reilly for her long service to the museum’s Collections Council.

    Rick Bartow (Wiyot, 1946—2016)
    Fox Spirit, 2000
    Mixed media
    Gift: Courtesy of Penny Ogle Weldon in memory of Kenneth L. Ogle, Jr.

    Holly Wilson (Delaware Tribe of Western Oklahoma/Cherokee, born 1968)
    Enough, 2015
    Bronze
    Museum Purchase: Eiteljorg Fellowship

     

    This article originally appeared in the November 2017 issue of Storyteller magazine. 





  • Artistry and Excellence: A conversation with Betsy Theobald Richards about Native Art Now!

    by Bryan Corbin, editor, Storyteller magazine | Oct 23, 2017

    Betsy Theobald RichardsTo lead the dialogue at a convening of scholars and top contemporary Native artists, the Eiteljorg has selected a nationally known art and social justice expert: Betsy Theobald Richards (Cherokee Nation). With two decades of experience in philanthropy, arts education, advocacy and theater directing and producing, Richards served at the Pequot Museum and Ford Foundation and now is program director for The Opportunity Agenda. With a passion for Native art (her aunt is the renowned artist Kay WalkingStick), Richards designed the format of the facilitated conversations she will lead at Native Art Now! on Nov. 11-12 that will examine the future of contemporary Native art.

    Storyteller magazine recently interviewed Richards about the program, and her comments are lightly edited for space:

    On why she designed the format of the Native Art Now! gathering of artists and scholars to include facilitated roundtable discussions:
    “I put the suggestion out there that (the Eiteljorg) might want to try something I had tried at one of my biggest convenings called ‘Creative Change’ . . . which was how to take a large group of incredibly talented, visionary folks, and have them have a dialogue. That isn’t what we normally have, which is panels where four people sit up on the dais and talk at people and take questions. I tried to help design a format that will allow people to have dialogue among themselves, to have thought leaders for folks that begin conversations; but that the conversation then becomes owned by the group.”

    On what insights she expects participants will gain from the facilitated dialogue with artists:
    “What I hope is to get everybody thinking to create a space where people can think as big as possible about the future. Not just, ‘Five years from now we should have this program or two more exhibitions in a year,’ not just the tactics or mechanical outcomes, but really have time for some dreaming. Dreaming is a very powerful thing.”

    On the challenges that contemporary Native artists face today that will provide context for the discussions:
    “Contemporary Native art is contemporary art . . . Often contemporary Native art is sidelined. Some people are interested in historical or ethnographic pieces; but our artists are living treasures. They deserve to make a living . . . We should all appreciate the artistry and the excellence of these contemporary artists.”

    On the key points that should be conveyed to funders about the importance of supporting contemporary Native art:
    “We forget as Americans that we are on Native land and that our Indigenous cultures are an asset, something very special to this country. I think that we need to start understanding — not just funders, but America in general — what an incredible asset of our heritage and our future that our Native cultures are. And one of the most visible and powerful ways to exhibit our living cultures is through our art . . . We are living cultures, and these artists are upholding our living cultures in magnificent ways just as our ancestors did . . . If funders and the general public want to support Native communities, one of the many ways is to support Native culture (through art). Also, Native art is cool. I think people need to buy some Native art.”

    On her social justice work and how that relates to the convening of Fellowship artists:
    “A lot of my work is around incorporating art, culture, pop culture and media into the work of social change. And I have continued in my work in Indian Country and am as dedicated as ever to Native American art and culture; and hopefully I’ll be bringing the skills that I’ve learned, both around facilitation and around how to advance a dialogue, to this convening.”

    NATIVE ART NOW!
    OPENING CELEBRATION AND CONVENING
    SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

    SATURDAY, NOV 11
    Artists and scholars will convene for a dialogue led by Betsy Theobald Richards about contemporary Native art. The morning and afternoon events and lunch together are $30 per person or $15 for students.
    10 a.m. to noon: Facilitated discussion
    Noon to 1 p.m.: Buffet lunch
    1–3 p.m.: Preview of clips from the Native Art Now! documentary followed by roundtable discussions.
    5–9 p.m.: Native Art Now! exhibit opening celebration. This evening event is $50 for members and $60 for nonmembers.

    SUNDAY, NOV 12
    10:30 a.m. to noon: Fellowship artists convening led by Betsy Theobald Richards. The Eiteljorg Fellows will deliberate on the Fellowship to help forge its future. This event is included with general admission and the public is invited to attend, but please register.

    To register to attend any of the events, contact Mary Whistler at 317.275.1316 or mwhistler@eiteljorg.com by Nov. 3 or log onto www.eiteljorg.org/NativeArtNow.

    Kay WalkingStick -- Wallawa Memory

    Image caption:

    Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee Nation)
    Wallowa Memory, 2003
    Lithograph
    Gift: Courtesy of the artist

    Photograph of Betsy Theobald Richards is courtesy of The Opportunity Agenda.

    This article originally appeared in the November 2017 issue of Storyteller magazine.





  • Contemporary art in the spotlight in months ahead

    by Bryan Corbin, editor, Storyteller Magazine | Sep 12, 2017
    In_Their_Honor_042

    Fall is an exciting time for Native American contem­porary art at the Eiteljorg. Two ongoing exhibitions, In Their Honor and The Geometry of Expression, examine the work of several Native contemporary artists. These are prelude to one of the most important contemporary art shows the Eiteljorg has ever staged: Native Art Now!, opening Veterans Day weekend.

    The current and upcoming exhibitions exemplify the broad continuum of Native expression, often with con­ceptual pieces, upending the notion that Native art is narrow in its mediums and styles.

    In_Their_Honor_043“We in Indianapolis can be proud of the fact that the Eiteljorg has one of the nation’s best collections of contemporary Native art, and visitors over coming months can experience many intriguing examples of works by today’s artists,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said.

    Located in the Hurt and Harvey galleries, In Their Honor pays homage to five influential Native contemporary artists, now deceased, who were past fellows in the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship.

    Visitors will be engaged by the expressive sculptures by Allan Houser, poignant paint­ings and prints from George Morrison and Harry Fonseca, animal-human transformational figures by John Hoover and compelling paintings and sculptures by Rick Bartow. All five artists were groundbreakers whose works were exhibited in numerous museums and universities and who opened doors to the art world for a new generation of contemporary Native artists.

    Produced by Jennifer Complo McNutt, Eiteljorg curator of contemporary art, In Their Honor will be on exhibit through April 1, 2018.

    Kay WalkingStick -- Wallawa Memory

    Nearby in the museum’s Myrta Pulliam Gallery of Photography, prints by three living Eiteljorg Fellows — Kay WalkingStick, Anna Tsouhlarakis and Wendy Red Star — use geometry in thought-provoking ways and undoubtedly will foster discussion. The exhibit, The Geometry of Expression, was produced by Dorene Red Cloud, assistant curator of Native American art, and will be up through Jan. 7, 2018.

    Both exhibits build anticipation for the Nov. 11 public opening of Native Art Now!, a retro­spective of some of the archetypal work of Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship artists over the past 20 years. The 39 works, some of them newly purchased and not shown before, will include paintings, photography, sculpture and three large installations in the special exhibit gallery.

    Native Art Now! will be accompanied Nov. 11-12 by a convening of scholars, curators and many of the living Eiteljorg Fellows who will participate in a discussion about challenges facing contemporary Native artists today, as well as a preview of an upcoming TV documentary about the artists.

    Once it closes Jan. 28, Native Art Now! will go on tour as a traveling exhibition to other cities to present the work of these artists to broader audiences. In conjunction with Native Art Now!, the Eiteljorg is publishing a major survey book that reviews several decades of contemporary Native art and is authored by many of the most prominent authors in the field.


    CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ART ON EXHIBIT AT THE EITELJORG

    In Their Honor, an ongoing exhibit of the work of Rick Bartow (Wiyot), Harry Fonseca (Nisenan Maidu/Hawaiian/Portuguese), John Hoover (Aleut), Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache) and George Morrison (Ojibwe), in the Hurt and Harvey galleries, through April 1.

    The Geometry of Expression, an ongoing exhibit featuring the work of Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee), Wendy Red Star (Crow), and Anna Tsouhlarakis (Navajo/Creek/Greek), in the Myrta Pulliam Gallery of Photography through Jan. 7.

    Native Art Now!, a traveling exhibit of iconic contemporary Native art from the permanent collection of the Eiteljorg Museum, in the special exhibit gallery Nov. 11-Jan 28.


    Image Captions:

    Top two images: 
    Works by five artists who participated in the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship are now part of the In Their Honor exhibition in the Hurt and Harvey galleries.

    Lower image:
    Kay WalkingStick (Cherokee)
    Wallowa Memory, 2003
    lithograph
    Gift: Courtesy of the artist

     

    This article originally appeared in the September 2017 issue of Storyteller magazine. 

     





  • Gold Fever

    by Johanna Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator of Western Art | Mar 22, 2015

    Ho for California

    Take notice. Ho! for California!: A meeting of the Citizens of the Village of Canajoharie and its vicinity, will be held at the house of T. W. Bingham, . . . Jan. 16, 1849 
    Letterpress print on paper
    Image courtesy of the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley
    BANC PIC 1963.002:1802—A



    This mountain-mass of gold, is an immense magnet, whose attractive power is drawing men from all parts of the world to itself.
    —Reverend Elisha L. Cleaveland, 1849

    As word of the gold discovery spread, thousands of people from all over the word prepared to undertake the arduous journey to California. Depending on the departure point, there were a number of routes to the gold country.

    Thousands migrated west by foot and with wagon trains along a network of trails that worked its way across the continental United States. These overland routes seemed direct enough, but they contained a host of unpredictable dangers. Misinformation from guidebooks meant many left ill prepared, and accidents, disease, supply shortages, breakdowns, and bad weather all posed serious threats once the trip had begun.

    For others, routes to California by sea offered a slightly safer alternative. Clipper ships departing from Eastern ports were the safest option, but this route also took the longest, as the ships had to travel south around the southern edge of South America before turning north to San Francisco. A popular alternative was to go by ship as far south as Chagres, Panama, disembark, then travel across the Isthmus of Panama to Panama City by foot or in smaller river boats. Once on the western coast of the country, travelers boarded a second ship that would take them onward to California. However, the demand for ships heading north was far greater than the supply, which left many eager gold seekers stuck in Panama City indefinitely.

    In addition to the tens of thousands who journeyed to California from the East, thousands more traveled from Europe and across the Pacific Ocean from places like China, Australia, and the Hawaiian Islands. 

     map01082

    Map of Overland Routes to California|
    From Precious Dust, 1994

     map02083

    Map of Water Routes to California
    From Precious Dust, 1994

    Go comment!




  • EITELJORG MUSEUM BREAKS ALL-TIME ATTENDANCE RECORD

    by DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg public relations manager | Jan 11, 2015


     BRIEFS - ATTENDANCE LINE FOR ANSEL ADAMS[1]
    Guests waited in long lines in 2014 to see the Eiteljorg's Ansel Adams exhibit.

     More than 161,000 visitors packed the museum in 2014, during the downtown Indianapolis cultural institution’s 25th anniversary year.

    Indianapolis, Ind. – More visitors experienced the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in 2014 than in any year in the institution’s 25-year history. Ansel Adams, the museum’s 2014 epic exhibition, attracted nearly 88,000 visitors over five months, making it the Eiteljorg’s best-attended show ever. Buoyed by this blockbuster and Jingle Rails: The Great Western Adventure, the Eiteljorg posted total attendance for the year of 161,000. The last time the museum posted an annual attendance record was in 2011 when more than 141,000 guests filled its halls, galleries and festivals.

     This attendance record illustrates the continued success of the Eiteljorg’s Project New Moon. The fundraising campaign, launched in 2010, sought to invigorate the museum with dynamic new interpretations of its mission.

    “Five years ago, our baseline attendance goal was 100,000,” said John Vanausdall, president and CEO. “But each year, thanks to shows like Pistols, Red/Black, Steel Ponies and Guitars, we’ve exceeded that goal.”

    Asked the next step in the Eiteljorg Museum’s advancement Vanausdall, assured: “In addition to exposing guests to the unexpected West, our institution is also charting new territory with Gold! Riches and Ruin – our next big exhibit..

    “The search for gold is one of the most compelling stories of the American West and when we open Gold! in March, visitors will get to see it, learn stories about those who struck it rich or died trying and, and children and families will even have the opportunity to experience enriching Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) activities – all related to the exhibit.”

    Other new endeavors at the Eiteljorg include the institution’s first-ever celebration of Juneteenth; the building of a stunning new shade structure that will transform the museum’s gardens along the Downtown Canal; and a welcome new addition to the museum's curatorial team: Scott Shoemaker (Miami Nation of Indiana).

    The Eiteljorg Museum’s 2015 calendar includes the following major exhibits and events:

    MAR 7 – AUG 9
    GOLD! RICHES AND RUIN
    Greed! Success! Adventure! Failure! Innovation! The promise of gold in the West lured men and women from around the world who yearned for wealth. But all that glitters isn’t, well… Experience the story of how gold has helped forge the American national identity through artifacts, art, stories and interactive experiences. Visitors will find a wide array of objects and images including mining equipment and tools, paintings, journals and diaries, clothing and personal effects, and of course, gold itself, in its myriad forms, including nuggets, coins, bars, and jewelry.

    MAR 21
    WOMEN IN ART MARKET
    Buy from some of the best female artists in the region at this annual event.

    JUN 20
    JUNETEENTH
    The Eiteljorg will host a community celebration of the 150th anniversary of Juneteenth – a day that commemorates the end of slavery in the state of Texas. The event and museum will be free of charge and will include music, talks, dance, theatre, interpreters, children’s art and Western-themed activities, displays, food, vendors, and more.

    JUN 27 and 28
    INDIAN MARKET AND FESTIVAL
    2014 Indian Market
    Join us for this art market and celebration of Native American cultures, featuring art, music, storytelling, dance, food and family activities. 

    SEPT.  12 – OCT. 11
    QUEST FOR THE WEST® ART SHOW AND SALE
    This monthlong exhibition features new works by some of today’s best Western artists.
    Opening weekend Sept. 10-12. Fee for opening weekend.

    NOV. 14
    EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIPcollage of fellows
    See the work of five of today’s best Native contemporary artists. This exhibit combats narrow perceptions of Native art and raises awareness of the full range of contemporary art.

    NOV. 21 -- JAN 2016
    JINGLE RAILS: THE GREAT WESTERN ADVENTURE
    Watch trains race from Indianapolis through the American West, passing a host of exquisitely reproduced icons, including Lucas Oil Stadium, the Grand Canyon, Golden Gate Bridge and more.

    DEC. 5
    WINTER MARKET
    Shop for unique holiday gifts at this annual market, featuring more than 30 regional artists.

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