Menu
Blog
Eiteljorg Musuem Blog
  • Eiteljorg events team wins prestigious award

    by Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art | Apr 17, 2014


    In May 2013 Nick and Brittany's wedding and reception took place at the Eiteljorg. Recently the Eiteljorg events team was honored by the International Events Society for the work it did to produce this outstanding production.
     

    Congratulations to Eiteljorg catering and events director Sarah Bean, events coordinator Heather Elmore and our friends at Kahn’s Catering for bringing home a prestigious award for 2013 Professional Achievement in Creative Events (PACE), given by the International Special Events Society (ISES)!

    Our team won for Best Team Effort (under $75,000) category for a wedding hosted at the Eiteljorg last May. It was an elaborate affair that included, among other details, images of Mickey Mouse hidden in unexpected places, such as floral arrangements and projected on the ballroom floor, obscured in the couple’s new monogram. (The couple became engaged at Disneyland.)

    Our team was chosen from a field of local events and venues including The Children’s Museum, The Alexander Hotel and The Conrad. We had to submit an electronic portfolio with details of the event and our part in planning it, along with memories and challenges experienced. We included documentation of the planning process, timelines, photos, budget details, etc. We could not list our name or any other vendor name. The winners were chosen by an out-of-state judging team based on details.

    Have you considered the Eiteljorg for your special event? Click this link to find out more about our award-winning event services!


    2013 Professional Achievement in Creative Events (PACE), awarded to the Eiteljorg Museum by the International Special Events Society (ISES).

     Sarah Bean and Heather Elmore - The Eiteljorg's award-winning events team! Congratulations!

    Go comment!




  • Important Charles Russell Painting to Travel

    by James Nottage, Eiteljorg vice president and chief curatorial officer | Apr 09, 2014

    From the Gund Collection of Western Art, we are loaning Charles M. Russell’s important 1913 oil painting, Crippled but Still Coming to the National Museum of Wildlife Art, Jackson Hole, Wyoming.  There, it will be featured in the exhibition, Harmless Hunter: The Wildlife Work of Charles M. Russell.  This notable exhibit for the first time examines a little known aspect of Russell’s art: the depiction of wildlife.  Our painting will be included in the accompanying book and will travel with the show to the Rockwell Museum of Western Art in Corning, New York, the Sam Noble Museum of the University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, and the Charles M. Russell Museum, in Great Falls, Montana.  It will be returned to the Eiteljorg in the fall of 2015.

    In place of the Russell painting, we will be featuring two wonderful watercolor paintings by the same artist that were also donated as part of the Gund collection.  Both of these works are watercolors that have been resting from light exposure for a short while.  They will go on exhibit in mid-April when Crippled But Still Coming is shipped to Wyoming. Be sure to stop in and see these wonderful watercolors.  They remind us that the artist painted a wide variety of Western subjects.  His imagination never took a rest and he once said, “if I lived a thousand years I could not paint all the things that come into my mind.”

    Charles M. Russell (American, 1864-1926)
    The Scouts, 1900
    Watercolor on paper
    The Gund Collection of Western Art, Gift of the George Gund Family


    Charles M. Russell (American, 1864-1926)
    Prairie Pirates, 1904
    Watercolor on paper
    The Gund Collection of Western Art, Gift of the George Gund Family


    Charles M. Russell (American, 1864-1926)
    Crippled But Still Coming, 1913
    Oil on canvas
    The Gund Collection of Western Art, Gift of the George Gund Family

    1 Comment




  • Modern Spirit | The Art of George Morrison opens this Saturday

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, Eiteljorg curator of contemporary art | Mar 25, 2014


    George Morrison (Chippewa), Cumulated Landscape, 1976, wood, 48 x 120 x 3 in.

    In 1999, the Eiteljorg gathered artists, the Native American advisory council, board members, and staff to determine the format for the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. There was one aspect of the program that elicited no discussion, only agreement. It was unanimous; George Morrison (Chippewa) would usher in the program as the first distinguished artist.

    “An artist who happened to be Indian,” as he liked to say, Morrison worked with the abstract expressionist in the1950’s and is an important modernist and role model for generations of young Native and non-Native artists. The Eiteljorg will exhibit Morrison’s prolific work beginning Mar. 29, 2014, in the Harvey and Hunt galleries.

    To celebrate the work and importance of this artist, the Minnesota Museum of American Art (MMAA) in St. Paul, Minnesota has assembled the first comprehensive retrospective of this key Native American modernist. The exhibition, Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison includes drawings, paintings, prints, and sculpture that bring together concepts of abstraction, landscape, and spiritual reflection. A total of 80 works in all, most from MMAA, represent Morrison’s life’s work in breathtaking depth. The exhibition is curated by W. Jackson Rushing III, Adkins Presidential Professor of Art History and Mary Lou Milner Carver Chair in Native American Art at the University of Oklahoma.


    The Red Painting (Franz Kline Painting), ca. 1960, oil on canvas, 47 x 79 in. Loan courtesy of Dorit and Gerald Paul

    This stunning group of artwork holds one piece with special significance to the Eiteljorg. It is owned by our friends and supporters Gerald and Dorit Paul. The Red Painting is an example of Morrison’s facility with the paint and his interest in the landscape, especially of his beloved Red Rocks, his home in Grand Portage, Minnesota. Not only is this painting incredibly significant in modernist terms, it also holds a fascinating story. While in New York City, Morrison became friends with Franz Kline, another important modernist painter. Morrison and Kline agreed to art barter and Morrison gave Kline The Red Painting. However; prior to fulfilling his end of the bargain, Kline died. It took some negotiations to retrieve the painting from Kline’s widow! For collectors, like the Pauls, it is always satisfying to have interesting stories as part of the artwork’s provenance.

    George Morrison died in 1999, months after he was honored by the Eiteljorg. The museum is proud to exhibit his work through Sep. 14, 2014.

    Opening Day Schedule
    Saturday, Mar. 29
    Doors open at 10 a.m.
    Public talk by exhibit curator Jackson Rushing
    1 p.m.
    Join us for an illustrated lecture by Morrison curator Jackson Rushing that documents, celebrates, and investigates the artistic achievement of George Morrison - a distinguished and beloved Chippewa modernist (1919-1999) whose artwork is held in numerous public and private collections.

    Go comment!




  • Eiteljorg Exhibit Specialist Belinda Cozzy Wins Lifetime Achievement Honor at Rose Awards

    by Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art | Mar 13, 2014
    We congratulate our very own Belinda Cozzy for winning a Lifetime Achievement Rose Award for excellence in public service. Belinda was one of 11winners announced at Wednesday night’s banquet honoring 86 nominees from all areas of the service industry across Indianapolis. Congratulations Belinda!

     Belinda Cozzy wins Rose Award  
    Belinda shows off her Rose Award plaque.

    Working on exhibit tear down.


    Here's where you often see Belinda - on a lift - fixing lights in the ceiling.  
     
    Belinda at colts community day
    She likes to have fun too! Here she is at Colts Community Day.

    About Belinda
    Once nominated, Belinda received letters of support from all over the city and even the nation. She is known for acts of service that go above and beyond. For example, she once drove to a nearby firehouse to borrow a piece of equipment to help an artist change the tire on his RV after working two back-to-back, twelve-hour work days. She also cared for a diabetic artist having some trouble in the Indiana humidity by giving him a ride on her golf cart repeatedly through a misting tent. She cares so much about the artists with whom she works that she cried with one and his wife as she helped them pack to leave a festival early due to an emergency. No stranger to emergencies, she was also instrumental in evacuating museum goers to a safe area during a tornado. While there, she entertained the crowd with stories and behind-the-scenes tours of exhibit production areas. Due to her 25 years in the industry, Belinda receives a Lifetime Achievement Award. 
    - From www.roseaward.com
     
    Belinda joins a long line of Rose Award recipients at the Eiteljorg. They include:
    2011 Maureen Surak
    2010 Eric Hinkle
    2009 Nicki Kasting
    2007 Benny Grider
    2005 Jan Eason

     

    Go comment!




  • The Eiteljorg and The Indianapolis Opera Team Up Saturday March 8

    by James Caraher, Indianapolis Opera artistic director and conductor | Mar 03, 2014

    On Friday, March 21 and Sunday, March 23, the Indianapolis Opera will present Giacomo Puccini's The Girl of the Golden West at Butler University's Clowes Memorial Hall.  This Saturday, the  March 8, members of the Indianapolis Opera Ensemble will present a live performance. Then, a lively discussion on The Operatic West | Myths and Realities of the 19th Century West will take place, starring both Eiteljorg and Indianapolis Opera experts. The Eiteljorg performance and discussion is free with museum admission.

    Indianapolis Opera artistic director and conductor James Caraher blogs about the upcoming opera and tells us why some of the music in it landed in a court of law.

    Girl of the Golden West stage pictureEveryone loves Giacomo Puccini and everyone loves a good Western! A handsome outlaw in disguise, the sheriff in hot pursuit, and a garter-snapping, pistol-packing, poker-playing heroine who will do anything to save the man she loves. Giacomo Puccini was fascinated by the American West, and California during the Gold Rush was the perfect setting for one of his most memorable leading ladies. (Source: Indianapolisopera.org)

    Girl of the Golden West
    holds a very special place in the long list of operas that Puccini composed, coming right after Madame Butterfly. It is unlike any other, combining the intimacy and romance of La Boheme with the grandeur of Turandot, all set in the American West during the gold rush. First performed in 1910, it was the first "commissioned" opera by the Metropolitan Opera, and was also it's first world premier. The opening night performance of Dick Johnson, the tenor lead, was sung by non other than Enrico Caruso, and the conductor for the evening was Arturo Toscanini, with Puccini himself in the audience! Talk about a star-studded opening. While this is one of Puccini's lesser-known operas, audience members will be surprised to hear some snippets of music that sounds surprisingly familiar. During the Act 2 tenor aria "Quello che tacete," there are several measures which can also be heard almost note for note in "Music of the Night" from Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom of the Opera! It could be an accidental similarity, but the Puccini folks decided to sue Mr. Lloyd Webber for plagurism. The outcome was an out of court settlement. I'll leave it up to you to decide whether or not it was an accident!

    About Conductor James Caraher
    Often referred to as “the singers’ conductor,” Caraher is a master at holding all the reins of the many forces of grand opera while seemingly able to clearly communicate his musical desires with each performer. Caraher frequently serves as guest conductor for other symphonies and opera companies and has lent his talents to Opera Company of Philadelphia, Kentucky Opera, Opera Memphis, Buffalo Opera and Nashville Opera. He devotes much of his time to the development of young singers by directing the Indianapolis Opera Ensemble, the Indianapolis Opera Young Artist Program. He lives in Indianapolis with his wife and two children.

    Indianapolis Opera at the Eiteljorg
    The Operatic West | Myths and Realities of the 19th Century West - A collaboration with the Indianapolis Opera
    Saturday, Mar. 8
    1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
    Eiteljorg vice president and chief curatorial officer James Nottage, the Indianapolis Opera’s artistic director and conductor James Caraher and guest stage director John Hoomes discuss "The Operatic West: Myths and Realities of the 19th Century West."  Members of the Indianapolis Opera Ensemble will present a live performance prior to the discussion. This event is free with paid museum admission. To learn more about the Indianapolis Opera and to purchase tickets for The Girl of the Golden West, visit www.indyopera.org.

    Go comment!
© Eiteljorg Museum. All rights reserved.