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  • Meet the Fellows | Meryl McMaster (Part IV of V)

    by Ashley Holland (Cherokee), Eiteljorg assistant curator of Contemporary Art | Oct 30, 2013

    Each week the Eiteljorg blog will profile artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Meryl McMaster: Immeasurable, the Art of Being, by Ashley Holland 
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog).

    Meryl McMaster
    (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)

    Photo credit: Ian Clark

    My artistic practice begins with photography evoking a journey that follows a path of self-discovery….My art unravels notions of identity and subjectivity as something that is never complete, but always in process and always formed from within. -
    Meryl McMaster

    Meryl McMaster’s work creates a paradigm of the artist as visual philosopher. Her pursuit of knowledge, connection to the natural world, and relentless dedication to profound beauty make her photographs sumptuous and complex. They are a world unto themselves. She invites the viewers to join her in this world, to take what they may, and to grow from their own conclusions.

    McMaster was born to a Euro-Canadian mother and Plains Cree/Blackfoot father in 1988. Her father, Gerald McMaster, is a well-known artist, author, and curator of Canadian aboriginal contemporary art. There is little question that this upbringing gave McMaster a great well of cultural and ancestral memory in which to immerse and emerge as herself. It is also of no small consequence that she, as an early career artist, exists in the era of important cultural and social movements such as Idle No More, in which Canada’s aboriginal people strive to reclaim their place and rights in their communities locally, provincially, and nationally. No doubt this influences her political and social views, of which her photographs act as a visual record.


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Anima (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Wingeds Calling (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Aphoristic Currents (In-Between Worlds series), 2013
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund

    McMaster conceptualizes her work and then proceeds to use the moment, the environment, and the circumstance of that particular sequence to document the culmination of her vision. She has a space in her home where elements and concepts are envisioned and created as the stepping-stones to the act of photographing. For McMaster, the camera becomes an object that is vulnerable and dependent on the environment around it.

    McMaster’s photographs continue to grow stronger as she adds layer upon layer of experience toward the spiritual maturity she seeks. Her constant exploration of identity and search for (self) realization translate beautifully into lush images with each subject she captures. Her photography series  In-Between Worlds , Ancestral , and Second Self demonstrate the potency of her artistic message. It is not surprising that one so interested in pursuit of the elevation of the human spirit and self-consciousness about her bi-cultural heritage would choose to work in the form of a photographic series, as if to better investigate a world, a view, through a multi-dimensional lens and a plethora of sculptural, cultural, and natural materials. 

    Meet Meryl McMaster, Friday, Nov. 8 at the Eiteljorg.

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
    Meryl is one of five 2013 Fellows and her artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.”

    Go comment!




  • Day of the Dead | This Saturday

    by Linda Montag-Olson, Eiteljorg public programs manager | Oct 25, 2013


    Skulls, skeletons and marigolds, are important elements of ofrendas (altars) created to honor and celebrate the lives of family, friends and ancestors who have passed on. Fresh foods, candles, photographs and personal items are also placed on the public and private ofrendas, to welcome the spirits return for a brief restful visit on Nov.2. This is the essence of Día de los Muertos, a traditional Mexican holiday, with roots in Aztec culture and Catholic traditions.

    On Saturday, Oct. 26, join us for the annual Day of the Dead celebration at the Eiteljorg. Museum guests will have a chance to remember their loved ones by adding a note or paper flower to the public ofrenda, create a personal altar to take home and pick up a recipe to make their own version of pan de muertos (bread of the dead).

    Ongoing short films (20 minutes) will show traditional Día de los Muertos festivities in the Mexican cities of Janitzio and Oaxaca, and give an authentic glimpse into the culture.

    Visiting artists and musical performers will share lively traditions with museum guests.

    Marvel at artist Beatriz Schlebecker’s intricate, brightly colored works of tissue paper art called papel picado (cut paper). Beatriz lives in Indiana and has been exploring and creating contemporary papel picado for ten years.

    Richard Gabriel Jr. fashions tin into shiny ornaments. He’ll lend you a hammer to make your own piece to take home. Richard lives in Tjeras, New Mexico and is a recent award winner at the Spanish Market in Santa Fe. 
     
    Anderson Ballet Folklorico will delight with swirling skirts and stomping feet - you can’t help but clap your hands and tap your own feet. Comparsa Tlahuicas volunteers will share the history of their amazing traditional costumes, masks and headgear as you sway to the beat of the performers.

    Dia de los Muertos celebrations are held across the United States in November as more and more people learn about the holiday from friends and neighbors and embrace the traditions of Day of the Dead. Plan a visit to the museum on Oct. 26 and join in the celebration!

    Go comment!




  • Meet the Fellows | Lawrence Paul Yuxwelupton (Part III of V)

    by DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg public relations manager | Oct 23, 2013
    Each week the Eiteljorg blog will profile artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Lawrence Paul Yuxwelupton: Master Mixer, Man of Many Colors, by Dana Claxton (Lakota) 
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog). 

    Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
    (Coast Salish/Okanagan)
     

    Photo credit: Alana Paterson 

    I work for art, not to be used by racism. I make art to get rid of racism. - Lawrence Paul Yuxwelupton

    Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun has been drawing and painting since he could hold an instrument in his hand. He once stated, "The paintbrush is like a weapon," and in his case, it is a weapon against the pen and the written word that colonialists used to dehumanize indigenous people and to steal Indian land. He has also stated, "I am a history painter." For over thirty years, he has been painting the "Indian" condition and all the complexities of being Indian, past, present, and future. He paints land…Indian land. The indigenous imperative to honor land has fueled most of his artistic output for the last three decades. And within the honoring of land, he weaves indigenous sovereignty and the de-subjugation and humanization of indigenous bodies right into the living land herself.

    Yuxweluptun has declared that "Canada is like a baby crawling around wearing a dirty diaper," suggesting that the nation is in an immature state of being and needs to come clean of its insidious past of legally oppressing Indians and the continued denial that there is anything wrong with the current state of aboriginal people. The bonds between Indian and non-Indian peoples are complex, filled with love, hate, desire, confusion, distrust, and fear. Canada and the United States have difficult histories that have shaped the difficult present. It is not always a pleasant picture, but Yuxweluptun vividly paints large-scale paintings and makes etchings, drawings, performance, installations, and sculptures that often depict these realities. His work addresses land use, land claims, and land spirits while always steadfastly stating that land is alive and needs to be respected and nurtured, cared for, loved. His work is shaped by indigenous imperatives of walking gently on the earth and not doing too much damage. His body of work has persuaded viewers to love Mother Earth and perhaps even love Indian people. He has often asked audiences, "Can you love Indian people?"


    Caution! You are Entering a Free State of Mind Zone, 2000. Acrylic on canvas.
    Private collection

    Yuxweluptun moves fluidly from large scale to intimate works, from color to black and white. Thirty-one works are included in this exhibition, ranging from large-scale acrylic on canvas to intimate drawings and prints.


    Floor Opener, 2013. Acrylic on canvas.
    Courtesy of Michael O’Brian

    The range of scale and hue and everything in between significantly represents his extensive oeuvre , moving with ease from one medium and scale to the other.
     

    Portrait of a Residential School Child, 2005. Acrylic on canvas.
    Private collection

    Whether abstract or his unique blend of Northwest Coast Salish surrealism, all the paintings maintain a color range that he invents. As a master mixer colorist, his palette refuses to remain the same after all these years of painting.

    Meet Lawrence Paul Yuxwelupton, Friday, Nov. 8 at the Eiteljorg.

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
    Lawrence Paul is one of five 2013 Fellows and his artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.”

    Go comment!




  • Artist-in-Residence Norris Chee (Dineh) - through Nov. 2

    by Linda Montag-Olson, Public programs manager | Oct 18, 2013

    Each fall the Eiteljorg connects Indiana students with Native artists from across the United States. This may be the only encounter some students have with someone from another culture and the excitement is palpable as they realize American Indians are alive and well today. The public is invited to the studios on Saturday afternoons where the artists will be available to speak with visitors as they work on their own projects.

    Painter Norris Chee (Dineh) 
    Meet the artist
    Saturdays
    Oct. 19 & 26
    1pm - 4pm
    Meet Norris, learn about his art and culture, and watch as he demonstrates his art-making techniques. 

    Airbrush workshop

    Saturday, Nov. 2
    10am - 3pm
    Fee $10 per participant
    (more info below)   

    Norris Chee (Dineh) is a painter who was raised in a very traditional Dineh home, and first learned to speak English in school. From his first pencil drawing on a second grade school desk, Norris knew he wanted art to be a part of his life.

    Norris will introduce students to Navajo culture and complete a drawing during his time with the group. Norris will share how animals and symbols play a part in the culture and language and how this was significant for the Navajo Code Talkers during WWll. Students will learn a Dineh word and draw a picture to help remember the word.

    Norris travels extensively across the United States entering art shows and winning awards, living his dreams of painting. Norris also works as an Artist in Residence for the state of Nebraska, visiting schools and communities, teaching students his artistic talents, methods and about the customs of his tribe.

    Pictured above:
    Norris Chee
    Eagle's Eye

     
    ABOUT THE AIRBRUSH WORKSHOP:
    This workshop is fun for the entire family! Get to know Norris, learn about his Dineh culture and his artwork, then roll up your sleeves and get to work. With Norris’ guidance, participants will design and create their own stencils, choose colors and create their own airbrushed t-shirt to take home.

    Because exact-o knives will be used for preparing stencils, this workshop is open to ages 10 and up with an accompanying adult. There will be a 1-hour break for lunch.

    Pre-register by calling (317) 636-9378. Please indicate your shirt size when registering (Adult – S, M, L, XL or Youth – S, M, L).

    Fee $10 per participant (covers all materials)

     

    Go comment!




  • Cleaning our beloved bronzes

    by Amy McKune, Director of museum collections, Video produced by Hyacinth Rucker, Eiteljorg new media and web coordinator | Oct 17, 2013

     
    To keep our outdoor bronzes looking good and to preserve them for future generations, we have to go through a cleaning and re-waxing process each year (especially for our two fountains).  


    This preservation process removes calcified scale buildup left behind from water and provides a wax coating to help preserve the patina on the bronze. Normally, this work is undertaken by object conservators.  But since the Eiteljorg does not have a conservation department, we usually hire some outside assistance.


    This year, we hired Richard McCoy and Associates to help on the project.  Richard has over ten years experience working as an objects conservator at major museums.  Earlier this year, he formed his owned business that is based in Indianapolis.  He often works with Brose Partington, a very talented kinetic artist and accomplished mount maker, to work with him on a variety of projects.  












    To build the crew needed to do this work, we arranged a six-week conservation internship for recent Purdue University graduate, Lindsey Zachman and invited IUPUI Museum Studies graduate students Claire Quimby, Rebekah Ryan and Lauren Baker, all currently interning in the Eiteljorg's collections department, to participate.  Registrar Christa Barleben and I rounded out the crew which managed in three days to clean and re-wax both the deer fountain by artist Kenneth Bunn and Southwest Summer Showers by artist Doug Hyde (Nez Perce, Assiniboine and Chippewa).

    Thanks to our crew:
    Richard McCoy, objects conservator
    Brose Partington, conservation technician
    Christa , Barleben, registrar
    Lindsey Zachman, conservation intern
    Rebekah Ryan, collections intern
    Claire Quimby, collections Clowes Fellow
    Lauren Baker, collections intern

    Go comment!
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