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  • Meet the Fellows | Shan Goshorn (Part V of V)

    by DeShong Perry-Smitherman, Eiteljorg public relations manager | Nov 06, 2013

    Over the past five weeks the Eiteljorg blog has profiled artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Shan Goshorn: Leaning in to Shan Goshorn's Baskets, by heather ahtone (Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations of Oklahoma)
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog).

    Shan Goshorn (Eastern Band of Cherokee)
    Shan Goshorn

    I strive to educate an audience about some of the unique issues that continue to impact Indian people. - Shan Goshorn

    Since 2008, Shan Goshorn has become one of the most fearless weavers. Recognized nationally for her hand-painted photography and abstract paintings, Goshorn has always been a multi-media artist. By integrating her vision for photography and human rights activism into woven baskets, she has silently given voice to her culturally driven messages.

    Goshorn lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and regularly travels home to North Carolina to connect with her extended family and her Eastern Band Cherokee community. As a full-time working artist, she credits working with the Qualla Arts & Crafts Mutual cooperative for giving her a broad knowledge of traditional Cherokee crafts. While working there as a teenager in college, Goshorn contracted with the Indian Arts and Crafts Board to prepare book illustrations of traditional basket designs. This job required her to look closely at how baskets are woven together. It seeded within her the desire to try weaving, but she never attempted the medium unti 2008, when she conceived the idea that a basket could serve as a metaphor of complex concepts related to traditional Native identity and contemporary issues. Her first conceptual basket addressed sovereignty, a metaphor expressing the interwoven and convoluted relationships between tribes and states. She employed the Tobacco Compact between the State of Oklahoma and the Cherokee Nation printed on paper as the material. Titled Pieced Treaties; Spider’s Web Treaty Basket , her technical success confirmed to her that she had found a new vessel for conveying her complex ideas.
     
     
    Pieced Treaties; Spider’s Web Treaty Basket, 2008. Arches watercolor paper splints, first printed with archival inks. Image courtesy National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution (266080.000). Photo by Ernest Amoroso.


    (Above left) Removal (Ancestral Homeland) and (right) Removal (Indian Territory), 2012. Mixed media.

    The aspect of the baskets that is perhaps most poignant, critical to their metaphorical currency, is found in the preparation process. Goshorn’s thoughtfully selected visual material, often a historic text document and a photographic image, must be prepared and scaled for printing in a final size that suits the intended form. It takes multiple prints of the primary source, each meticulously cut to an exact width and length in both vertical and horizontal strips, if not diagonal strips, from which Goshorn will then begin the weaving process.

     

    shan goshorn
    Unsolicited Gifts or How to Eliminate a Culture, 2012. Archival watercolor paper splints, first printed with archival inks.

     It is in the cutting, this physical deconstruction of history—both text and image, the slicing and dissecting—that the metaphor takes root. For many tribes, paper has been used as a weapon against their cultures, their sovereignty, and their identities. Goshorn takes the pieces she has broken down and reconstructs them into baskets. These forms, all built following traditions that reach farther back than federal history, speak to the continuum that lives within the cultures, the legacies that breathe in each new generation of Native artists, ready to be picked up and carried through the twenty-first century by the young people Goshorn is inspiring with her art.

    Meet Shan Goshorn, Friday, Nov. 8 at the Eiteljorg.

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
     Shan is one of five 2013 Fellows and her artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.” - See more at: http://www.eiteljorg.org/interact/blog/eitelblog/2013/10/30/meet-the-fellows-meryl-mcmaster-(part-iv-of-v)#sthash.Xk79h5kW.dpuf

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  • It’s always the season to show R-E-S-P-E-C-T

    by Ashley Holland (Cherokee), Eiteljorg assistant curator of contemporary art | Oct 31, 2013

    Happy Halloween! A friendly reminder to always be respectful of other cultures when you are picking a costume…

    Each year, around Halloween, I face the same horror. No, it isn’t goblins or ghosts that frighten me. It is the ever-present “Indian costume.” There are a few reasons I am strongly opposed to the idea of anyone “dressing up” as an “Indian,” including cultural misrepresentation and reducing a diverse people into a single stereotype. I use the quotations with “Indian” because these are false representations.  Even though costume wearers are not portraying a specific person or group, they still do harm. By reducing a group of people to a stereotype, one perpetuates the misunderstandings that surround Native peoples. Native cultures should not be portrayed as a caricature. They are strong and vibrant. Show respect by not dressing up as an “Indian” during Halloween and the rest of the year. And do not be afraid to tell others why those costumes are inappropriate.


    CAPTION: "Indian costumes makes me sad."
    Ashley Holland (Cherokee),assistant curator of contemporary art (in the red sweater)

     

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  • Meet the Fellows | Meryl McMaster (Part IV of V)

    by Ashley Holland (Cherokee), Eiteljorg assistant curator of Contemporary Art | Oct 30, 2013

    Each week the Eiteljorg blog will profile artists who will be featured in RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship. The exhibit opens Nov. 9. Details below!

    What follows is an excerpt from Meryl McMaster: Immeasurable, the Art of Being, by Ashley Holland 
    (from RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship exhibition catalog).

    Meryl McMaster
    (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)

    Photo credit: Ian Clark

    My artistic practice begins with photography evoking a journey that follows a path of self-discovery….My art unravels notions of identity and subjectivity as something that is never complete, but always in process and always formed from within. -
    Meryl McMaster

    Meryl McMaster’s work creates a paradigm of the artist as visual philosopher. Her pursuit of knowledge, connection to the natural world, and relentless dedication to profound beauty make her photographs sumptuous and complex. They are a world unto themselves. She invites the viewers to join her in this world, to take what they may, and to grow from their own conclusions.

    McMaster was born to a Euro-Canadian mother and Plains Cree/Blackfoot father in 1988. Her father, Gerald McMaster, is a well-known artist, author, and curator of Canadian aboriginal contemporary art. There is little question that this upbringing gave McMaster a great well of cultural and ancestral memory in which to immerse and emerge as herself. It is also of no small consequence that she, as an early career artist, exists in the era of important cultural and social movements such as Idle No More, in which Canada’s aboriginal people strive to reclaim their place and rights in their communities locally, provincially, and nationally. No doubt this influences her political and social views, of which her photographs act as a visual record.


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Anima (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Wingeds Calling (In-Between Worlds series), 2012
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund


    Meryl McMaster (Plains Cree/Blackfoot)
    Aphoristic Currents (In-Between Worlds series), 2013
    Digital chromogenic print
    Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship Acquisition Fund

    McMaster conceptualizes her work and then proceeds to use the moment, the environment, and the circumstance of that particular sequence to document the culmination of her vision. She has a space in her home where elements and concepts are envisioned and created as the stepping-stones to the act of photographing. For McMaster, the camera becomes an object that is vulnerable and dependent on the environment around it.

    McMaster’s photographs continue to grow stronger as she adds layer upon layer of experience toward the spiritual maturity she seeks. Her constant exploration of identity and search for (self) realization translate beautifully into lush images with each subject she captures. Her photography series  In-Between Worlds , Ancestral , and Second Self demonstrate the potency of her artistic message. It is not surprising that one so interested in pursuit of the elevation of the human spirit and self-consciousness about her bi-cultural heritage would choose to work in the form of a photographic series, as if to better investigate a world, a view, through a multi-dimensional lens and a plethora of sculptural, cultural, and natural materials. 

    Meet Meryl McMaster, Friday, Nov. 8 at the Eiteljorg.

    Schedule for opening weekend of RED:Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Friday
    NOV 8
    5:30–7:30 p.m.
    Celebration!
    $40 – includes Saturday’s activities
    To commemorate the opening of RED: the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, the museum will honor the five Native Fellowship winners with an intimate gathering that celebrates their artistic accomplishments.

    7:30 p.m.–12 a.m.
    Contemporary Arts Party
    $15 at the door, $10 in advance – includes Saturday’s activities
    Celebrate the opening of RED by partying all night to the sounds of A Tribe Called Red and DJ Kyle Long of the Cultural Cannibals. Additional entertainment will be provided by the comedy improve group the 1491s, Big Car, Know No Stranger, and more!
    Tickets are available for purchase at www.Eiteljorg.org

    Saturday

    NOV 9
    All Day
    RED: Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship
    Be among the first to experience RED.
    Opening Day a
    ctivities include a gallery tour with the Fellows from 10 a.m.-12 p.m and from 1–3 p.m. a presentation by comedic cultural critics, the 1491s. Saturday's event is in collaboration with the 2013 Spirit & Place Festival. This festival reaches 20,000 people each year through dozens of “never before seen” programs that promote growth of the human spirit.

    ABOUT THE EITELJORG CONTEMPORARY ART FELLOWSHIP
    Meryl is one of five 2013 Fellows and her artwork will be featured in the exhibition RED: The Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship, opening Nov. 9. This biennial program recognizes the accomplishments of one invited and four juried Fellows, which are chosen by a panel of independent experts. As part of the Fellowship, each artist receives a $25,000 unrestricted cash award and their work is exhibited and further explored in an accompanying catalog. In addition, the museum purchases a total of over $100,000 worth of art from the Fellows for the permanent collection, adding to a body of work that has given the Eiteljorg Museum a collection of Native contemporary art that has been referred to as the “greatest in the world.”

    Go comment!




  • Day of the Dead | This Saturday

    by Linda Montag-Olson, Eiteljorg public programs manager | Oct 25, 2013


    Skulls, skeletons and marigolds, are important elements of ofrendas (altars) created to honor and celebrate the lives of family, friends and ancestors who have passed on. Fresh foods, candles, photographs and personal items are also placed on the public and private ofrendas, to welcome the spirits return for a brief restful visit on Nov.2. This is the essence of Día de los Muertos, a traditional Mexican holiday, with roots in Aztec culture and Catholic traditions.

    On Saturday, Oct. 26, join us for the annual Day of the Dead celebration at the Eiteljorg. Museum guests will have a chance to remember their loved ones by adding a note or paper flower to the public ofrenda, create a personal altar to take home and pick up a recipe to make their own version of pan de muertos (bread of the dead).

    Ongoing short films (20 minutes) will show traditional Día de los Muertos festivities in the Mexican cities of Janitzio and Oaxaca, and give an authentic glimpse into the culture.

    Visiting artists and musical performers will share lively traditions with museum guests.

    Marvel at artist Beatriz Schlebecker’s intricate, brightly colored works of tissue paper art called papel picado (cut paper). Beatriz lives in Indiana and has been exploring and creating contemporary papel picado for ten years.

    Richard Gabriel Jr. fashions tin into shiny ornaments. He’ll lend you a hammer to make your own piece to take home. Richard lives in Tjeras, New Mexico and is a recent award winner at the Spanish Market in Santa Fe. 
     
    Anderson Ballet Folklorico will delight with swirling skirts and stomping feet - you can’t help but clap your hands and tap your own feet. Comparsa Tlahuicas volunteers will share the history of their amazing traditional costumes, masks and headgear as you sway to the beat of the performers.

    Dia de los Muertos celebrations are held across the United States in November as more and more people learn about the holiday from friends and neighbors and embrace the traditions of Day of the Dead. Plan a visit to the museum on Oct. 26 and join in the celebration!

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  • Buckaroo Bash: Your ticket to a one-of-a-kind experience

    by Tamara Winfrey Harris, Eiteljorg vice president of communications and marketing | Oct 24, 2013


    Buckaroo Bash co-chair Cathy Turner

    “We are lucky to live in a city that offers several really enjoyable annual events that benefit community institutions, but there is nothing, NOTHING else like the Eiteljorg Museum’s Buckaroo Bash,” says Cathy Turner, who for eight years has helped lead the dedicated committee who makes the museum’s annual fundraiser happen. Buckaroo Bash, presented by Curtis Publishing, returns to the Eiteljorg Museum on Friday, Oct. 25, with the theme “Carats, Corsets and Cowboys.” 

    The event, which raises money for the museum’s educational programs, is the only place in Indianapolis where you can get expert instruction in line dancing with a modern twist; watch talented chefs face off in the dessert battle to end all battles and bid on high-end items and unforgettable experiences (How does a shopping trip in the Big Apple grab you? Dinner prepared by the Eiteljorg Museum president and CEO John Vanausdall? How about tea for two at American Girl Place in Chicago?).

    Party-goers will also enjoy live music from The Endless Summer Band, a raffle of fine jewelry courtesy of G. Thrapp Jewelers, a silent auction and a surprising menu by Kahn's Catering.

    Lisa Staley, who works alongside Turner as Bash co-chair says, “This year’s Bash is something completely new. If you’ve been coming for years, get ready to be surprised. If you’ve never joined us, you’ll want to get your ticket today!”

    Tickets to Buckaroo Bash are $200 per person. Attendees not only get an unforgettable evening, but also have the satisfaction of knowing that they are helping the museum reach more than 24,000 students each year with experiences, including one-on-one interaction with Native artists, gallery interpreters and in-classroom storytelling that reveals the diverse stories of the West.

    “Bash is a lot of fun to be sure,” says John Vanausdall, Eiteljorg president and CEO. “But it is also one of the most important things we do each year. Education is the backbone of our mission and Buckaroo Bash helps ensure that we can continue to successfully enact that mission.”

    This year, buying a ticket and registering for silent auction express check-out is even easier. You can do it right online at Eiteljorg.org.

    For more information, contact Sarah Farthing at 317.275.1333 or sfarthing@eiteljorg.com.

    Special thanks to Co-Chairs:
    Cathy Turner & Lisa Staley

    Honorary Chairs:
    Joan SerVaas & Larry Roan

    Co-Honorary Chairs:
    Burke Eiteljorg & Carlie Irsay-Gordon 

    Committee:
    Cindy Hoye
    Carrie Kirk
    Melissa Mau
    Dona Stohler
    Jana Varanka
    Myrna Ware 



    With additional support by:
    Citimark Management Co., Inc.
    Flanner & Buchanan Funeral Centers
    G. Thrapp Jewelers
    The Chef's Academy

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