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  • Introducing New Art 2.0 Artist Vanessa Enos

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 11, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.

    Bonifer Pond, 2009
    Feeling Yesterday, 2009
    Monotype, edition 1/1
    22 ⅜ x 18 ½ inches
    $670

    Vanessa Enos is an enrolled member of the Northern Cheyenne tribe in Montana. She is also of Walla Walla, Yakima, and Pima heritage. Enos moved with her family to the Umatilla Indian Reservation when she was nine and later graduated from Weston McEwen High School. Enos has an associate’s degree from the Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia and currently lives in the Pendleton area. She began visiting Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts at age 15. Crow's is a nonprofit organization aimed at providing opportunities for Native Americans through artistic development. In fact, the Eiteljorg produced New Art 2.0 through its partnership with Crow's.  Enos shares that while at Crow's, she observed, volunteered, and found opportunities to "play" in the studio.

    I’ve seen other artists come in and watched them do their printmaking. I’ve learned throughout the years, and with [Frank Janzen - Crow's Shadow master printer] now here, I’ve definitely learned techniques I never thought you could do. It’s amazing.

    Bonifer pond
    Bonifer Pond, 2009
    Lithograph, edition 3/16
    17 x 24 inches
    $540

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  • New Art 2.0 | Introducing Jim Denomie

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 10, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.

    Rabbit with star vest
    Rabbit with Star vest, Looking In (Burnt Umber Sketches series), 2011
    Monotype, edition 1/1
    20 x 15 inches
    $615

    Jim Denomie is a painter who received his bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Minnesota. He has participated in both group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States and Europe. Denomie won a Bush Artist Fellowship in 2008 and an Eiteljorg Fellowship in 2009. He has lectured at many institutions, including the University of Minnesota-Minneapolis, the Duluth Art Institute in Duluth, Minnesota, and The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. He currently resides in Shafer, Minnesota.
    Jim Denomie Canoe series (7630)
    Untitled (Canoe series), 2011
    Monoprint with oil pastel,
    edition 1/1
    30 x 22 ⅜ inches
    $1,060

    More on artist Jim Denomie from www.jimdenomie.com.

    Jim Denomie was born in Hayward, WI on July 6, 1955 and currently lives in Franconia, MN. Primarily a painter (oil, acrylic and watercolor), he also creates unique works of art in ink, and oil pastel drawings, printmaking, photography, and found object sculpture.

    In 1995, Denomie received a BFA from the University of Minnesota. Since then, he has shown extensively in the U.S. and in Europe and his work has been placed in the permanent collections of numerous museums and public and private collections. He is the recipient of several prestigious grants and awards.

    In 2005, Denomie completed a task of painting at least one painting a day, for one year. Much of the work was showcased in the exhibition “New Skins” at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in 2007, and he was named one of City Pages Artist of the Year for 2007. In 2008, he was awarded a Bush Artist Fellowship and most recently, a 2012 McKnight Fellowship.
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  • New Art 2.0 | Introducing Corwin “Corky” Clairmont

    by Jennifer Complo McNutt, curator of contemporary art, and Ashley Holland, assistant curator of contemporary art | Dec 09, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.

    Banana Polar Bear
    Banana Polar Bear, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22 ⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    Our Indian communities have thousands of years of history that need to be recognized and celebrated. We have many stories yet to tell from the past and the present as we are still here. - Corwin "Corky" Clairmong (Salish Kootenai)

    Corwin "Corky" Clairmont was born at the St. Ignatius Mission on the Flathead Reservation in Montana. In 1984, after living in Los Angeles for 14 years, Clairmont returned to the Flathead Reservation, where he lives and works today. Clairmont is part of an important group of Native American artists who use their cultural experiences and background in combination with techniques such as printmaking and photography to bring attention to the traditions and challenges that are part of the lives of Native people and their communities. Clairmont is a 2003 Eiteljorg Fellow and has exhibited his work across the U.S. His work is included in many public and private collections, including the Eiteljorg Museum’s permanent collection.

    Waiting for the ice
    Waiting for the Ice, 2012
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22⅜ x 30 inches
    $1,210

    More about Corky
    Corky is a celebrated contemporary artist, combining his experience as a native person and tribal member with a post-modernist view of the realities of life as indigenous people struggle to retain their identities and sovereignty into the 21st century. He is also a teacher, mentor and a community activist, and lives in Ronan. A member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Corky has been the art director at Salish Kootenai College since 1984. Previously, he was an instructor and printmaking department head at Otis/Parsons Art Institute in LA.

    Corky holds a BA from MSU, did a graduate fellowship at San Fernando State University and received an MFA from California State University at Los Angeles. His work has been exhibited from coast to coast and around the world, including Germany and New Zealand, and has been reviewed by the New York Times. He also designed the cover and emblem for the American Indian Library Association and a large granite warrior memorial for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Nation in 2007.

    Through the years, he has served on many professional boards, curated and juried many art shows, and he has received a Ford Foundation grant and NEA and MAC grants. Corky was also awarded the 2008 Montana Governor’s Arts Award for Visual Art. (Source: www.Montana.gov)
     
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  • New Art 2.0 | Introducing Rick Bartow (Wiyot of Northern California)

    by User Not Found | Dec 05, 2014

    New Art 2.0 is an exhibition of prints, many created by Eiteljorg Fellows and contemporary Native and Non Native artists. It is a blend of “op art,” landscape, political and environmental statements as well as portraiture. Approximately 90 limited edition prints will be on exhibit and available for sale with prices ranging between about $500 - $4000.  New Art 2.0 closes Feb. 8, 2015.
     

     1. CSP 08-304(3)
    Standing up Kestrel, 2008
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    30 x 22 ⅜ inches
    $2,260

    A word from Rick Bartow about the above artwork:
    Like roots underground or bones beneath flesh, the marks and erasures, the gestural immediacy of the graphite drawing of 1979 exists twenty years later beneath the layers of bright colors in the drawings of 1999….Twenty years on paper the marks and erasures: my past, present, and future.

    Personal experiences, cultural engagement, and global myths, especially Native American transformation stories, are the heart of Bartow's art. Animals and self-portraits populate his iconography. Bartow is known for astute interpretations of literary, musical, and visual sources.
    3. CSP 13-304(6)
    Crow in a Boat, 2013
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    30 ⅛ x 22 ½ inches
    $2,260
     
    2. CSP 08-305(14)
    Spirits in the Air/Magpie, 2008
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    22 ⅜ x 30 inches
    $2,260

    80. CSP 13-303(10)
    Bird Hat, 2013
    Monoprint, edition 1/1
    30 ⅛ x 22 ½ inches
    $2,260
     
    Rick Bartow is one of Oregon's most important artists, and is increasingly gaining a national and international audience. Central to Bartow's work is the theme of connection and transformation, particularly between the human and animal realms, and between corporeal and spiritual dimensions of existence. Bartow's great-grandfather left his Wiyot tribal homeland in northern California nearly 100 years ago to homestead in Oregon, where the Bartow family has lived ever since. (excerpt from Crow's Shadow Institute of the Arts website)

    Bartow was awarded an Eiteljorg Fellowship for Native American Fine Art in 2001.


     
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  • Inside the Eiteljorg's Arctic Gallery

    by Johanna Blume, Eiteljorg assistant curator of western art | Nov 26, 2014

    artic-dogsledding blog
    Sleds have long been used for transportation of goods and people in the Arctic. Before contact with European and American explorers, Alaska Natives, pulled sleds with small teams of dogs harnessed alongside the sled, or with human labor. After contact, larger teams of dogs were harnessed to the front of the sled. Since many communities in Southwestern Alaska aren’t connected by roads, sleds are still a crucial mode of transportation in the fall and winter. Today many people use snowmobiles to pull their sleds, although dog teams are still a common sight. Dogsleds are also part of recreational life in the Arctic. Since 1973 dogsled teams from around the world have competed in the Iditarod, an annual dogsled race that runs from Willow, Alaska to Nome, Alaska.

    There are many objects in the Eiteljorg’s collection related to dogsleds, some of which are on display. In our Arctic gallery you can see a Yup’ik made dogsled, and an Inupiat carved walrus tusk that depicts a dogsled team and driver as well as a variety of animals the Inupiat traditionally hunt.

    artic - archives univ of alaska
    Bethel, 1939-1959
    Image Courtesy: Averill and June Thayer Photographs; Alaska and Polar Regions Collections, Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks.
    artic - leaving dawson
    Dogsled team preparing to leave Dawson for Nome, Alaska, Feb. 11, 1900
    Image Courtesy: University of Washington Libraries Special Collections, William E. Meed Photograph Collection, PH Coll 246

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